OBEE Credit Union opens Point Ruston branch

The Olympia Brewery may not be the first thing that comes to mind when you think of banking, but O Bee Credit Union wants to change that. A leader in providing innovative financial solutions for more than 60 years, O Bee announced the opening of its newest branch, a unique blend of brewpub and financial service center in Point Ruston.

O Bee’s rich history as the original credit union of the Olympia Brewery is reflected in the interior of the new building. It features a brewpub aesthetic including brick walls, wood barrels, hand- painted murals, a transaction bar accented with brass rails and local beer taps, chalkboard signage and decor reminiscent of times gone by. Historic photos of Point Ruston and Tacoma are displayed throughout. “The pub atmosphere ties in well with our history. It’s reminiscent of the old brewery tasting room where

the community met, and workers gathered after the end of a shift,” says James Collins, CEO.

This will be the sixth branch opening for O Bee and its first venture into Pierce County. “It’s exciting,” says Collins. “We’re one of the most unique credit unions in the country with products that can’t be found at most financial institutions.” In addition to an array of loan options including home and auto, O Bee offers its signature brewery credit and debit cards featuring favorite brands like Rainier and Olympia. The Berenstain Bears® Cub Account is also part of

O Bee’s selection of products. Cub Accounts provide an incentive program for young savers that’s part of a financial education program emphasizing the concepts of “Save, Share, Spend and Earn.”

“Banks shouldn’t feel cold or impersonal and having a brick-andmortar establishment is important to our membership, so we decided to have some fun with the design concept,” added Collins.

O Bee Credit Union (The Olympia Brewing Co. Employees and Families Credit Union) was started Feb. 15, 1955, by Ted McGill, who worked in the bottle house of the brewery. This full-service not-for-profit credit union, owned by its members, has five other branches located in Lacey, Tumwater, Tenino, Yelm and West Olympia. Membership is open to all Washington residents.

LEAH GROUT

For Additional Information O Bee Credit Union obee.com

 

In the Spirit

What is happening in the Indigenous art world in our region? Find out at the 13th annual IN THE SPIRIT Contemporary Native Arts Exhibition, where you can see 29 works from 21 Native artists. The exhibition opens Saturday, June 30 at the Washington State History Museum in Tacoma and will be on view through Sunday, August 12. There will be three opportunities for visitors to meet some of the artists as well: the awards ceremony on July 1, 3:00 PM; gallery talks on Third Thursday evening July 19, 5:30 PM; and the Northwest Native Festival on August 11, 12:00-7:00 PM.

IN THE SPIRIT connects the Washington State Historical Society’s (WSHS) Native collections with the vibrant contemporary arts scene. Visitors will see mixed media, paintings, beadwork, textiles, sculpture, carving, and basketry. Many of the artists live in Washington but others hail from Idaho, Montana, Michigan, Minnesota, and even as far as Vermont and Virginia. Art collectors will be interested to know that most of the works in the show are available for purchase.

Artist RYAN! Feddersen spoke about the connection that IN THE SPIRIT provides. “As a mixed-heritage native artist living in an urban area, contemporary Indigenous arts is one of the ways I connect to my culture. In the Spirit provides an annual opportunity to bring together native artists to share work and create cultural dialogue. Receiving the Honoring Innovation award for my work in the 2017 exhibition made me feel recognized and supported. I look forward to engaging with this exhibition as it continues to grow and acknowledge the thriving contemporary Indigenous arts field.”

Each spring, Native artists from many states and Canada submit work for consideration by a jury of local artists and curators. The 2018 jury included artist Alex McCarty, Makah, a graduate of Evergreen State College; curator and artist Asia Tail, Cherokee, a graduate of Cooper Union School of Art in New York; and Lynette Miller, head of collections at WSHS.

“The jurying is blind, meaning we don’t know the artists’ names until we have selected the pieces to be exhibited,” said Miller. “I enjoy being surprised when an artist creates something that’s completely different from the work they submitted in earlier years. I love seeing the creative spirit at work!”

The Washington State Historical Society typically adds one work from each annual exhibition to its collection, and the selection is announced at the artist awards ceremony (in 2017, RYAN! Feddersen’s mixed media sculpture Micro Spill was chosen). The 2018 artist awards will include Best in Show, Honoring Innovation, Honoring the Northwest, and Honoring Tradition, along with the purchase prize. During the run of the exhibition, visitors can cast votes for the People’s Choice first and second place awards. Ballots are available in the gallery, and People’s Choice winners are revealed at the culminating festival.

The free IN THE SPIRIT Northwest Native Festival is an indoor/outdoor celebration on Saturday, August 11, from 12:00 to 7:00 PM, co-hosted by the History Museum and Tacoma Art Museum. Celebrate the diverse cultures of the Northwest with a Native arts market, dance, song, music, food, and a designer runway fashion show. The day will end with a performance by special guests Khu.éex’ (pronounced koo-eex), a band co-founded by artist and musician Preston Singletary. Khu.éex’ translates to “Potlatch” in the Tlingit language.  The History Museum and Tacoma Art Museum are excited to bring this immersive festival experience to the community.

For more information, see www.inthespiritarts.org.

 

Annual Paws In The Park

The Dog-A-Thon at Fort Steilacoom Park in Lakewood is a South Sound tradition. Sponsored by the Humane Society for Tacoma and Pierce County, it is the largest dog walk in Western Washington. Now the nonprofit organization is broadening the 28th annual fundraiser to include even more pets. The 2018 event, on Saturday, July 28, is renamed “Paws in the Park featuring the Dog-A-Thon.”

Human and canine participants will still be able to enjoy scenic trail walks around Waughop Lake with water/treat stations along the way. There will still be contests for people to show off their pet’s talents, and there will be delicious eats to sample. Attendees can even adopt their very own Humane Society kitten, dog, or rabbit.

For the expanded Paws in the Park, the Humane Society plans to enlarge the pet resource component by ensuring that every vendor and sponsor has a pet-related product, service, or information.

28th annual paws in the park featuring the dog-a-thon Entertainment will be more robust, with training sessions and demonstrations led by local trainers. KIRO-TV is the media sponsor of the event and will have on-air talent as the emcee.

Paws in the Park remains the Humane Society’s largest fundraising event. This year’s goal is to raise more than $325,000. These funds help the organization care for more than 11,000 animals each year. Donations provide vital support for innovative programming; fostering underage litters of puppies, kittens and bunnies; treatment and rehabilitation for victims of cruelty; veterinary care for injured animals; and many other community services.

SHELBY TAYLOR

For Additional Information:
The Humane Society
thehumanesociety.org

Choosing The Right Private School

Puget Sound parents have so many private schools to choose from that it can be tough to decide on just one. Luckily, parents can turn to The Good School: How Smart Parents Get Their Kids the Education They Deserve for guidance. The book’s author is Peg Tyre, a former Newsweek education reporter and also the author of The Trouble with Boys. Tyre spoke to ShowCase about points to consider when evaluating a school.

In preschool, the relationship between teacher and student is key. This connection is more important than any curriculum, Tyre says. Look for a preschool teacher who is very engaged. Have a conversation with a prospective teacher about their current classroom. They should be able to speak about individual students’ strengths and weaknesses and be well-informed about their background, interests, and emotional and academic achievements.

The early years: words, words, words Children should be surrounded with words, especially in the early years, Tyre says. Look for books in the classroom and be sure the class makes regular visits to the library. In the preschool and kindergarten years, be sure the teacher is providing the building blocks for learning to read.

Math cannot be an afterthought. From the first days of school, kids should be exposed to math concepts. Tyre says there is no need to wait until children are older and able to think and speak in more abstract ways. She says that math ability has been measured days after birth and seems to be innate in all of us. In the U.S., parents, kids and even teachers may describe a person as “bad at math.” In other countries where kids perform better in math, however, if a student is not performing well in math, parents, kids and teachers say the student needs to work harder. “Math is not a talent,” says Tyre. “It’s a muscle you develop.”

Don’t focus too much on standardized test scores. Sometimes good test scores can indicate that a school is doing well at educating students, says Tyre, but other times it can indicate that the school is teaching to the test. Standardized tests measure only about one-third of the curriculum that should be taught, so if the school is teaching only the test material, your child is missing out on a lot.

There is no excuse for a school day with no recess. Apart from the obvious physical benefits of exercise, says Tyre, studies have shown that recess also increases cognitive functioning. Kids need a break of at least 20 minutes a day. The same is true for middle-school and high-school students.

Teachers matter, even more than you think. Although not even a “super teacher” can erase the effects of poverty on students, says Tyre, excellent teachers teach more and can accelerate students’ rate of learning. And good schools champion great teachers. Look for schools that provide teachers with mentors, instruction and discussion of best practices.

JORDAN MARIE MCCAW

Anthem: Community-Centric, Thankful and “Loud”

We all have a favorite coffee shop. For some, it’s a place that offers a quiet ambiance. For others, their favorite is a matter of convenience: A quick fix from the drive-thru before the morning commute. And then there is Anthem Coffee, delivering exceptional service, an energetic atmosphere and pretty fabulous coffee.

Anthem isn’t new to the coffee game. Before launching the brand in 2011, CEO and cofounder Bryan Reynolds and his family spent five years learning the business under the Forza banner, becoming the No. 1 store in the franchise. Once their agreement with Forza ended, the family started their own shop and opened the downtown Tacoma location, followed by downtown Puyallup. Two new stores opened at the end of 2017—Old Town Tacoma and University Place. In June of this year Anthem plans to open its fifth location in Tacoma’s Stadium District.

Its mission is simple—create an environment in the community where relationships can be built. Anthem calls this “heroic hospitality.” “Without community, there is no business,” says Reynolds. “We inspire community. We want to be a part of the customer’s story and fuel people for their journey.”

What about the name? “We are loud. We are different from the normal coffee shop,” says Reynolds. The family felt that Anthem, something that is often loud and unifying, best described what they were trying to create. The name stuck. “When you drink Anthem coffee, you live loud.”

Along with a menu of espresso-based drinks, Anthem offers wine, beer on tap and an impressive food menu, including naan bread pizzas, gourmet sandwiches and appetizers like sweet potato fries.

The Reynolds family appreciates the continued support from communities they serve. “We are thankful for the belief in our brand. We are thankful for every day we get to serve people,” says Bryan Reynolds.

What’s your Anthem?

ANDREA LERUM

For Additional Information, location and hours:
Anthem Coffee
myanthemcoffee.com

Alaffia

a•laf•fi•a \ ah-la-fee-uh \ noun. A common greeting or valediction originating from central Togo, Benin and Nigeria. Alaffia means a state of peace, health and well-being.

One of the most successful fair-trade body-care organizations in the natural products industry is located in Thurston County. Most residents are probably not even aware of this innovative company right here in the South Sound. Most are probably also not aware of the significant, life-changing impact Alaffia is bringing to residents of West Africa.

Olowo-n’djo Tchala was born and raised in the village of Kaboli in the West African nation of Togo. There he shared a single small room with his mother and seven siblings. The boy dropped out of school in the sixth grade when his family couldn’t afford the tuition. In the years after, Tchala worked alongside his mother on her farm.

In 1996 Tchala met and fell in love with a Peace Corps volunteer, Prairie Rose Hyde, while she worked in Kaboli. After her service ended, the couple moved to the United States with a shared goal: finding a way to alleviate poverty in West Africa.

Hyde entered a graduate program at the University of California, Davis. She studied international agricultural development and ethnobotany, the scientific study of relationships between people and plants. Tchala studied English and earned a degree in Organizational Theory. Determined to make a difference in his home country, the native son, along with Hyde, created Alaffia, based in Tumwater.

Alaffia’s success is not measured simply by profit. For this innovative company, success is measured by empowerment, with the goal to alleviate poverty and encourage gender equality in Togo. Special projects, including a maternal health clinic, school construction and reforestation efforts, have made a significant impact on Togolese communities.

Doing good business has been an extremely successful model for Alaffia. The company has expanded its product lines from natural body care to hair care products and African home textiles featuring

artisan hand-stamped fabrics. Alaffia’s recipe for success is simple: “helping our communities in West Africa sustain themselves through the fair trade of their indigenous resources. The more each of us can do, the closer we are to everyone working together.”

HILLARY RYAN

For Additional Information:
Alaffia
alaffia.com

Straight From The Heart

Straight from the Heart, United Way’s ninth Annual Dinner Party and Auction celebrates community spirit in action. Over 220 people gathered at Indian Summer Golf & Country Club on Saturday, Feb. 10, 2018, to enjoy amazing food and wine and participate in a silent and live auction to raise money in support of United Way’s mission: to fight for the health, education and financial stability of every person in our community. Emcees Nancy Leson and Dick Stein from KNKX 88.5’s Food for Thought segment were joined on stage by Jeff Kingsbury of Stokes Auction Group, Seattle. Keynotes included United Way’s new executive director Chris Wells and United Way’s board president Liz Davis. The evening was both fun and successful.

Star Chefs On Broadway

The Pantages Theater was transformed into a 1920s speakeasy with rum runners and floozies hosting gambling games and enticing guests to try a variety of giggle waters so delicious they should have been prohibited. Dapper gents and dolled-up dames enjoyed a variety of delicious appetizers in the lobby before going into the 100-year-old theater. They were served a four-course dinner by Asado along with fine wines and dessert, and a delicious “last bite” by Corina Bakery. The entertainment continued throughout the evening with a dazzling program by EnJoy Productions.
Funds raised totaled in excess of $310,000, including the first round of seat-naming opportunities sold for the Pantages Theater renovation.

Twinstar Celebrates 80 Years

It all started during the Great Depression, in 1934, when an Olympia High School math teacher wanted to find a way to help his fellow teachers put down roots and be part of the community. On a teacher’s salary it was difficult to obtain a loan to buy a house or a car unless you were willing to repay that loan at 17 percent or more. By 1937 that teacher was able to enlist the support of 15 other local teachers. In January 1938 they started Thurston County Teachers Credit Union.

The fledgling credit union made its first loan for $150. It was off to a bustling start and it kept growing. In 1981 it merged with other credit unions from Grays Harbor County. This necessitated a name change to Twin County Credit Union. This change lasted only a year. The organization expanded again, bringing in credit unions from Centralia and Clark and Pierce Counties. In 2006 a new name was revealed: TwinStar Credit Union.

Because of TwinStar’s start as a teachers credit union, says Paulette Raico, director of marketing, “education is pretty special for us.” She notes that members can apply for college scholarships or for Classroom Cash.

“We have an employee who spends hours on the road,” Raico continues, “teaching financial literacy in classrooms from Tacoma to Portland, Yelm to Ocean Shores. You may not know this, but banks had to be compelled by the government to give back to local communities. Credit unions, on the other hand, have always been close to our members’ communities and the causes our members care about.”

To celebrate its history in the community, TwinStar Credit Union has created an 80-year commemorative booklet that includes historical facts and photos, and quotes from members and employees. TwinStar has also planted a ceremonial oak tree to commemorate 80 years of service in the community at the Lacey Administration building.

We congratulate TwinStar for 80 years serving the community!

HILLARY RYAN

For Additional Information:
TwinStar Credit Union
twinstarcu.com/branches

Heroes of Bavaria – 75 Years of BMW Motorsports

On May 12th, America’s Car Museum (ACM) is bringing the “Heroes of Bavaria– 75 Years of BMW Motorsports” collection from the BMW Car Club of America Foundation to its location in Tacoma as a crowdfunding campaign. The seventeen iconic race cars in the display will celebrate and detail BMW’s storied motorsports legacy. There will be a Bavarian-themed grand opening celebration at ACM that evening to welcome the collection to the museum.

Donating to ACM’s crowdfunding effort will be rewarded with opportunities to extend the donator’s experience beyond what’s offered by typical automotive museums, including passes to the exhibit’s opening celebration, limited edition posters and books, private tours of the ACM collection, and the ability to “adopt-a-winner.” One lucky individual can also purchase an exclusive one-day experience at a BMW performance driving school, where they will be able to learn about the theory, physics and mechanics of performance driving.

“As proven by the extraordinary collection of race cars within Heroes of Bavaria exhibit, BMW rightfully earns the title of the ‘Ultimate Driving Machine.’ Their vehicles have been tried-and-tested on race tracks for the last 75 years,” says America’s Automotive Trust CEO Adam Langsbard. “We’re thrilled to be the first to display this unrivalled collection on the West Coast and share BMW’s many motorsports accomplishments with the hundreds of thousands guests who visit ACM each year.”

The festivities of the grand opening will include classic German food and drink as well as a live discussion moderated by ACM Master Collector Peter Gleason. The discussion will be held with several notable BMW figures, including:

  • Bill Auberlen, the winningest BMW factory race car driver in history
  • Erik Wensberg, M Brand Manager for BMW of North America
  • Tom Plucinsky, BMW Group Product and Technology Department Head

Tickets to the opening night include member discounts and are available at the Heroes of Bavaria page on ACM’s website. Also, a free limited edition commemorative poster is available for the first 150 people through the door.

If you aren’t able to attend the evening opening, ACM Curator of Exhibitory Scot Keller will be leading an exclusive early entry Curator Talk & Tour on the morning of May 13. He will delve into BMW’s history and provide expert insight to the remarkable vehicles on display.

“The Heroes of Bavaria exhibit celebrates the history of BMW racing by featuring noteworthy race cars, beginning with the infamous 328,” said Keller. “The two-liter 328 – arguably one of the most successful sports cars of the 1930s – is just one of example of BMW’s motoring legacy. It has achieved a class win in the celebrated Mille Miglia in 1938 and an overall victory in 1940.”

Other notable vehicles include the very first 1961 700 RS, a 1972 3.0 CSL Groupe 2 Rally Car – the only one of its kind – and a 2000 Williams Formula F1 driven by Ralf Schumacher in eight total races, achieving three podium finishes.

To donate to the “Bring the BMW Heroes of Bavaria to ACM” crowdfunding campaign, please visit:

https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/bring-the-bmw-heroes-of-bavaria-to-acm-cars#/.

If   you’d like more information on the “Heroes of Bavaria” opening celebrations, go to americascarmuseum.org.  by eric pylvanainen and martina preston