Enhanced Breast Cancer Imaging Technology

Women 40 or older have been reminded for years that having an annual mammogram is an important part of their overall wellness. “There are many factors that can increase the risk for breast cancer, such as family history, but the biggest risk is being a woman,” advises radiologist Alison Reinbold, MD. That’s why it’s so important to have a screening mammogram done regularly— you’ll increase the chances of detecting breast cancer in its early stages when more treatment options are available.

Early detection has improved further with the introduction of 3D technology. Diagnostic Imaging Northwest recently unveiled this enhanced screening for mammography in Puyallup and Bonney Lake.

Also known as digital breast tomosynthesis (or tomo), 3D mammography is used in combination with 2D mammography. “During the exam, a patient will hardly notice a difference,” notes Dr. Reinbold. The images collected are displayed as a series of thin slices that can be evaluated individually or as a dynamic, interactive 3D animation. “We are able to see up and down through the tissue and remove extraneous layers, which makes it easier to find abnormalities.”

The significant advantages of 3D mammogram are the clarity of the image and the ability of the radiologist to review the breast from different angles. This is particularly important for women with dense breasts, who are also at increased risk of developing breast cancer. The greater clarity of the breast images improves early detection and the increased accuracy provides patients greater peace of mind. 3D mammography has been proven to reduce the frequency of additional testing by as much as 30 percent.

Diagnostic Imaging Northwest offers 3D mammography at three locations. Each has been accredited as a Breast Imaging Center of Excellence by the American College of Radiology, which means that patients will find the most comprehensive imaging care services available.

We encourage our over-40 readers to talk with their doctor this fall about scheduling a mammogram.

JULIE LEYDELMEYER

For Additional Information or to Schedule a Mammogram
Diagnostic Imaging Northwest
253.841.4353
dinw.com

The Parallel Powers of Music and Athletes

Sarah Ioannides’ dynamic presence on the podium for Symphony Tacoma has won praise from audiences and critics internationally. The New York Times has described her as a conductor with “unquestionable strength and authority.”

The physicality of Ioannides’ career requires dedication and perseverance, much like an athletic endeavor. She shares her story of injury, healing and music as a lens through which others might envision succeeding in anything that requires both mental and physical discipline.

“I’ve always had a passion for running,” says Ioannides, “but… with having two knee surgeries, conquering Lyme disease, and bringing up three children—while living in three states from coast to coast—my physical strength needed recovery… an ongoing challenge with constant travel.”

After moving to Tacoma, she says, she committed to resolve her knee struggles and to regain balance and strength. In 2017 she met Alison Unterreiner, PT.

Unterreiner says physical therapy relies on rehabilitating systematically and deliberately. And running requires a person to train effectively and to be patient for the results. Both physical therapy and running require self-discipline to do the work and to wait for the recovery or performance.

When Unterreiner and her husband attended Symphony Tacoma’s opening concert, the physical therapist was entranced by the performance and the music. But her PT self also focused on the conductor and the physicality of her job.

Ioannides told Unterreiner “I’ve never been very sporty,” but the physical therapist begged to differ: “What you are doing on the podium—takes endurance and strength and movement awareness and timing. That is the essence of athleticism.” This ignited talk of the training parallels of musicians and athletes, the need for selfdiscipline, and having the patience to let the music “sit” or let the body adapt.

After a few months of rehabilitation and running again, Ioannides’ focused dedication enabled her to complete the Sound to Narrows 12K, placing 11th in her age group.

Ioannides’ goals began with wanting to stay fit on the podium, and stay energetic to manage being a wife, mother and conductor. She now believes in her athleticism and plans to stay strong for conducting, for running and for life!

KELLY LENIHAN

For Additional Information on Running Therapy
therunnersclinicpt.com

Olympia Orthopaedics Welcomes New Sports Medicine Physician

Moving to the Pacific Northwest is a new adventure for Leila Borders, MD, who is joining the team at Olympia Orthopaedics. Hailing originally from Georgia, the doctor stayed true to her southern roots when pursuing her undergraduate and graduate degrees at Emory University and Mercer University, both in her home state.

“I’m excited to make Olympia my new home,” says Borders. “I was initially worried that I might get homesick for Georgia, but when I came out to interview I was pleasantly surprised to find the plants and foliage were similar, so that helped put me at ease.”

Before starting her new role, Borders is completing her primary care sports medicine fellowship at the University of Cincinnati Medical Center. She completed her internal medicine residency at the same institution. As part of her training during the last year, she is helping college, high school and semiprofessional athletes to stay at peak performance, in addition to addressing routine health care issues and injuries.

“I enjoy sports medicine because I am able to help change a patient’s quality of life,” the doctor explains. “It’s wonderful when I can help someone with their injury or chronic joint pain and it allows them to do the things they want to do.”

One way Borders will do this in Olympia is through total joint readiness for patients preparing for joint replacement surgery. Maximizing a patient’s ability to engage in physical activity before surgery can help the patient have much better results after surgery.

The doctor is also hoping to work with both recreational and elite athletes to optimize their performance. “One of my favorite things has been working with the student athletes at a rural high school,” says Borders. “It’s such a rewarding experience helping them to improve their athleticism and I’m looking forward to doing the same in Olympia.”

Borders is certified in internal medicine by the American Board of Internal Medicine. Olympia Orthopaedic’s Westside Clinic has begun scheduling appointments for Dr. Borders.

We welcome Dr. Borders and her expertise to our community.

JULIE LEYDELMEYER

For Additional Information
Olympia Orthopaedic Associates
3901 Capital Mall Dr SW, Olympia
360.709.6230
olyortho.com

From Slavery to the Founding of Centralia

Most people know that Washington state was named in honor of U.S. President George Washington. But did you know that there was another George Washington who played prominently in our state’s history? The founder of Centralia was also named George Washington. In recognition of his 200th birthday, the city’s residents are commemorating his life and good works in a yearlong celebration culminating with the unveiling of a bronze statue this past August.

Centralia’s George Washington was born Aug. 15, 1817, in Virginia to a white woman of English descent and a black man who was a slave. Knowing that her child with dark skin would likely be taken from her and eventually become a slave too, the mother asked a white couple to raise him as their own. Her friends James and Anna Cochran agreed. This set the stage for Washington to live a remarkable life, though one with many hardships as well.

Washington and the Cochrans eventually made the journey west to find, as Washington said, “any decent place in this world.” Together, through hard work and legal ingenuity, they acquired 640 acres where the Skookumchuck and Chehalis rivers join. This would become a settlement known as Centerville, and later Centralia.

As the community grew, George Washington lifted it up in every way he could. Stories about his generous spirit run deep. He cared for and supported his foster parents until their deaths. He took wagons to Portland to bring back rice and supplies to feed his neighbors during hard times. He paid others’ debts to stop foreclosure on their homes. He started the city’s first floral club because he loved flowers. He was the best in town at manning a barbecue, according to local lore.

“George Washington was not only a unique figure in Pacific Northwest and American history, but he was a really good man and someone who should be celebrated,” says Brian Mittge, chair of the George Washington Bicentennial Committee. “We invite everyone to join us in celebrating our founder.”

JULIE LEYDELMEYER

For Additional Information
George Washington Bicentennial Committee
ourgeorgewashington.com

Ultimate Fall Getaway in Leavenworth

Ready for a midweek escape? Look no farther than Leavenworth, Washington, nestled on the east slope of the central Cascade Range. Fall’s cooler nights and shorter days mean the mountainous region comes alive with vibrant colors of orange, yellow and red, providing breathtaking views as you drive along the Cascade Loop Highway.

At an elevation of 1,200 feet, the Bavarian-themed village of Leavenworth provides an excellent base for enjoying outdoor activities your family will love. There are over 800 miles of accessible trails for hiking and biking. You can play a round of lateseason golf or miniature golf. Take a walk along the Wenatchee River at Waterfront Park. Visit an orchard to pick apples or pears. Pack a picnic at the Cheesemonger’s on Front Street and enjoy all the sights and sounds of Leavenworth in autumn. If you enjoy the arts, check out the events lineup of music, opera, theater, dance, films and more at Icicle Creek Center for the Arts.

While exploring the streets of downtown Leavenworth, you can imbibe in a little wine-tasting in any of 20 tasting rooms. Indulge in an afternoon of “retail therapy” in the shops, followed by some quiet time in Front Street Park. This beautifully landscaped park in the heart of downtown provides a welcoming respite after a busy day. It’s also the site for some of Leavenworth’s most exciting fall festivals and celebrations.

Stick around through the weekend to enjoy the Autumn Leaf Festival, Leavenworth’s original festival dating back to 1964. There’s also live music in the Gazebo, Art in the Park, Fall Wine Walk and Oktoberfest. Visitors from all over the country flock to scenic Leavenworth in September and October to indulge in traditional festivities, fantastic food and of course beer!

Take in a little sightseeing while immersing yourself in fabulous fall color. Head to Lake Wenatchee, located halfway between downtown Leavenworth and Stevens Pass. The 489-acre lake offers over 12,000 feet of waterfront with plenty of space to relax along the shore and take photos of the stunning fall scenery. The reflection of vibrant autumn colors on the lake is breathtaking.

Tumwater Canyon, located along the Stevens Pass highway, is one of the top fall-foliage viewing spots in the region. Along the way are multiple pull-off areas for incredible viewing—and photo opportunities—of the towering cliffs standing above the roaring Wenatchee River. Don’t forget your camera!

For information on places to stay and things to do in Leavenworth, visit leavenworth.org.

KELLY LENIHAN

Fair Trade Gems Protect People

Do you think about where the products you purchase come from and how they were manufactured? Social responsibility is a growing concern for many consumers and businesses. Whether it’s coffee or computers, beauty products or building supplies, or food for pets or people, we want balance between what we’re buying and how it was made.

The jewelry industry was put in the spotlight in 2006 when the movie Blood Diamond illustrated the illicit measures occurring to fund extremist activities. Improvements have been made in the diamond trade since, but little had been done to formalize fair trade practices for colored gem stones.

“We have always done our best to work with ethically sourced gems, but there were few industry standards,” explained Phyllis Harrison, co-owner with her husband, Steph Farber, of LeRoy Jewelers and The Art Stop. “We’ve found a great partner in Columbia Gem House, which is a world leader in fair trade practices for gem stones.”

Based in Vancouver, Washington, Columbia Gem House promotes that its fair trade gems are closely tracked from mine to market to ensure that every gem has been handled according to strict protocols. These protocols include environmental protection, fair labor practices at the cutting and jewelry factories, and a tight chain of custody. Columbia says these protocols eliminate the possibility of treated gems or synthetics being introduced into the supply chain.

“We are confident that we are now getting the full backstory for gems we purchase,” said Harrison. “We know who mined it, how it was cut and what the profits are supporting. That means we can assure our customers that they can wear their jewelry with joy and pride.”

LeRoy Jewelers is a family-owned and -operated business in downtown Tacoma. For more than 75 years, it has been helping customers convey their personal stories through beautifully crafted and unique jewelry.

JULIE LEYDELMEYER

For Additional Information:
LeRoy Jewelers
940 Broadway, Tacoma
253.272.3377
ljewelers.com

Trend Report: Fall 2018

The trends emerging for fall 2018 can be summed up in one word: comfort. If you love classic pieces and steer clear of the eccentric, then you are in luck. Much of what is trending this season is comfortable and demonstrates a slightly new take on our favorite wardrobe staples.

Puffy coats + capes
The puffy coat is easily the go-to outerwear piece for just about everyone living in the Pacific Northwest. Instead of black, brighten your fall look by opting for a coat in red or pink. The cape is also making a comeback. While not as popular in recent years as the puffy coat, it is an item worth adding to your outerwear lineup. It is comfortable and perfect for day and night, giving you a pulled-together, polished look.

Prints!
Plaids and animal prints definitely have their place among fall trends from head to toe. The trick with wearing either is not to overdo it. Try pairing a plaid jacket with solid-color trousers or animal print heels with ankle jeans.

Lady in red or pink—or both!
Bright red and pink are going to make a statement this fall, infusing much-needed vibrancy into what can sometimes become a monotonous palette of grays and blacks. Try different hues like fuchsia and millennial pink.

Footwear: Bootie obsession + slingbacks
The ankle bootie has been having a moment for the past few seasons. This fall, designers are showing white booties. This is an unexpected and surprising twist on a favorite. While gorgeous, a white bootie might prove to be a bit of a hassle—be sure to choose a fabric that is easy to clean! Slingbacks and kitten heels are having a revival. Both looks are professional and make for an easy day-to-evening transition.

ANDREA LERUM

Bathrooms Made Perfect For Seniors

Local family-owned Silverado Showers LLC specializes in lowmaintenance customized senior showers with easy-to-clean nonporous, solid surface products. According to company owner Larry Lenord, “Silverado can meet your bathroom needs with showers that are professionally installed and guaranteed.”

Because of customization and ease of use, a Silverado Shower is perfect for seniors with mobility concerns, says Leonard. “We are the experts in tub-to-shower conversions with over 20 years of experience.” He notes that most conversations are being completed in two days.

Every solid surface shower that Silverado installs is custom-designed to meet any mobility challenges and to fit the needs of the users. Features to choose from include walk-in showers, floor-level entrances, shower seats and benches, roll-in edges on the shower pan, customizable easy-reach shelves and caddies, handheld shower wands, and grab bars. “Safety and ease of use are the ultimate goals,” says Leonard.

The design process starts with a solid one-piece shower. Then you can choose between low profile, standard height or ramped curbs in standard and customized sizes. There are also custom wall surrounds in smooth, textured, slate tile, or subway tile finishes with over 50 color options.

Seamless, nonporous surfaces are ideal for use in the bathroom, says Leonard, since there are no microscopic gaps where mold, germs or bacteria can hide. For a fully custom look that transforms the entire bathroom, matching solid surface vanities with integrated, seamless sinks can be installed to complete the space.

Escape from the everyday and rejuvenate your bathroom into your very own luxury sanctuary, as practical as it is beautiful.

Silverado Showers serves the greater South Sound area, including South King County, all of Pierce County, Gig Harbor, Port Orchard, Lacey, Olympia and surrounding areas. For more ideas on how you can customize your solid surface shower, check out silveradoshowers.com or visit the showroom in Fife.

LEAH GROUT

For Additional Information
Silverado Showers
LLC 5007 Pacific Hwy E, Suite 21, Fife
253.310.6540
silveradoshowers.com

Rustic Luxury Renewal

Nestled on 11 acres with a breathtaking view of Mt. Rainier, this Pan Abode home made a grand statement when it was built in 1980. Still, the homeowners envisioned an upgrade that would take it to “dream” status for them. Creating great entertaining space was the primary goal of the remodeling project of this Edgewood estate. The lively homeowners throw a lot of dinner parties and pool parties, and even occasionally host wedding events on their luscious grounds.

The addition to their home proved challenging, given the unique nature of the structure. But their dreams were realized when owners of American Dream Design Build, Scott Overby and Jim Burbridge, began the project. The team focused primarily on connectivity to the outdoors and the original appeal of the cedar home.

They installed large sliding glass doors, relocated windows, added a sleeping porch and deck, and used lighting and heating units to create a year-round sanctuary. Even the homeowners’ beloved tree was incorporated into the design. The team built the deck around the tree and created yet another talking point for the homeowners’ social gatherings.

Next, the homeowners decided to design an extra-large kitchen for entertaining that also functions for their catering business. Transforming the previous small kitchen into a commercial kitchen twice the size was no small feat. Inset cabinetry with open plate racks line the walls. Brass faucetry pairs beautifully with the soapstone countertop and a custom apronfront sink. A custom copper hood spans 84 inches above the range.

“American Dream Design Build has a team of skilled artisan builders that was able to meet all of our design challenges while keeping our vision intact,” says homeowner Doug Herrick. “We are very happy with the end result.” He added that it will be loved for years!

Upon completion, American Dream Design Build and The Puyallup Design Center were so taken with the remodel projects that they submitted them to the Master Builders Association competition and received REX (Remodeling Excellence) Awards on both projects.

KELLY LENIHAN

For Additional Information
American Dream Design Build
americandreamdesignbuild.com

Well 80 – Olympia’s Hottest New Brewery

Well 80 Artesian Brewing Company opened its doors March 19 in downtown Olympia. Complete with a restaurant and a 10-barrel brewing system, Well 80 is a brewery and brewpub built on the site of one of Olympia’s famous artesian wells. In addition to tasty craft beers, Well 80 serves pizza, burgers and sandwiches, all with a unique twist, in its all-ages restaurant.

Co-owner Chris Knudson is enthused by revitalization efforts bringing a new sense of excitement to downtown Olympia. He also points to a number of craft breweries in the area that have surfaced in the past few years. Three Magnets Brewing, Matchless Brewing and Top Rung Brewing are joining local staple Fish Brewing Company.

“Olympia’s history is built on beer,” Knudson says. “There’s a growing brewing community here and we’re happy to be part of it.”

Knudson is speaking of Leopold Schmidt, a politician and brewer from Montana, who traveled to Olympia in 1895 to observe construction of the Washingtonstate capitol. After being introduced to Olympia’s artesian water, he proclaimed, “With this water, I can brew better beer than ever!” The next year, at the foot of Tumwater Falls, the Olympia Brewing Company was born. Its beer was made with water from the artesian wells made famous by the slogan “It’s the Water.”

At Well 80, all of its “Well Made” beers are brewed in-house by experienced brewers. The company also features a series of rotating guest taps supporting the local brewing community. You might find Triceratops Pennsyltucky Lager, Cascadia Elderberry Porter, or Whitewood Cider Co. Olivia Newtown-Jonathan cider blend.

Well 80’s goal is to follow in the footsteps of Leopold Schmidt, Paul Knight and all the other pioneers that made great beer from some of the best water in the world.

KELLY LENIHAN

For Additional Information
Well 80 Artesian Brewing
514 Fourth Ave E, Olympia
360.915.6653
well80.com