Pantages Theater Returns to Historic Glory

Tacoma not only creates it also celebrates its artistic history.

Slated for the wrecking ball in the 1980s, the historic Pantages Theater located in downtown Tacoma had seen better days. Built in 1918 for vaudeville king Alexander Pantages as part of his theater empire, the beloved theater was in deep decline and neglect. Demonstrating true Tacoma grit, citizens rallied together and saved the performance space that became part of the City of Tacoma and later the Broadway Center for the Performing Arts.

Although the loss of this historic treasure had been adverted, recent patrons, staff and performers have all known that there was much more that needed to be done. Peeling paint, sound from the street and uncomfortable seats were indicators that changes needed to be made.

Completed this November, the most recent renovation returns the inside of the Pantages much closer to its original state and also consists of updates for the safety and comfort of today’s audiences and performers.

From the new color scheme, based on the forensic research of the 22 layers of paint, to the addition of rich decoration to the private boxes that feature rosettes and shells, the Pantages has returned to it’s former glory. Details that had previously been difficult to see have been revealed and the architectural elements have been enhanced.

Modern attendees will appreciate features such as wider seats, cup holders, a new center aisle, fewer stairways, new handrails and lighting. What patrons won’t see are the new seismic and safety updates that will preserve the theater’s structure and integrity should an earthquake hit. Additionally, the acoustics of the space have been greatly improved with the elimination of the carpeting that previously absorbed sound and newly built floors.

With the busy holiday season right around the corner, now is the perfect time to see for yourself the glorious Pantages while attending a live performance.  Come down to the Theater District and celebrate! Hilary Ryan

Image By: Justin John Ryan

 

Timeless Kitchen Design

Sixty-nine percent of homes for sale list the kitchen as a major selling point, compared with forty-nine percent for the bedroom and twenty one percent for the living room. The kitchen is a communal space, where guests and family members meet first thing in the morning for breakfast and late into the night with a few drinks. By including a luxury kitchen in your home, you will sell your property an average 8% faster than other homes in the same zip code. If you only have limited resources, then start by designing a timeless and beautiful kitchen.

 

Striking, Subtle and Sophisticated Lighting

A good kitchen allows for decent cooking; a great one encourages so much more. Increase the versatility of your space by installing different lighting options. The simplest solution is dimmer switches. They can be on full brightness to wake the kids up before school, and then lowered for a relaxing evening. Go for something bold and modern to give the kitchen a personality, but also have the option to illuminate just around key cupboards and appliances. Lights are often an afterthought, but thinking about them upfront can help you to create a truly mesmerizing space.

 

Opening Up Your Space

The kitchen is a center for parties and events, so think about how you can open up the space to more people. In winter, large windows, glass doors and mirrors can give the illusion of a much wider environment. In summer, these windows and doors can be opened to extend the area outside. Bringing a few plants and fresh herbs into the kitchen can help to create a seamless transition between indoors and out.

What About Tech?

The global smart home market is expected to exceed $50 billion by 2022, so incorporating WiFi into your refrigerator could help to future-proof your property. However, don’t act prematurely. Some house hunters will be put off by excessive tech and it can be difficult to take with you when you move out. Play it safe by sticking to classic kitchen tech such as dishwashers and modern fridges.

 

For many home buyers, the kitchen is the most valuable room in the house. Get this right and you could add thousands of dollars to your property’s selling price. Consider versatility and timelessness, sticking to classic, but luxury designs.

Karoline Grimes

 

Asian-Inspired Food, Beautiful Ambiance

From the moment you enter Indochine, you feel as though you have been transported to an exotic locale. The indoor water feature fills an unassuming fish pond surrounded by rich wooden tables and benches. Warm lighting and Asian-inspired décor help set the mood. And an open floor plan invites guests to interact with one another.

While the ambiance is certainly a draw, it is the food that keeps guests returning time and time again. Known for its fusion of all Asian cuisines, Indochine creates dishes that are inspired by Thai, Chinese and even Northwest cultures. Toasted seasame wraps, a mouth-watering Indochine favorite, features chicken caramelized with roasted cashews, peanuts, sweet mango and aromatic basil served with flaky flatbread. This interpretation is requested by guests over and over. Each menu item is carefully constructed by the chefs to be not only delicious but visually stunning, says Becca Bergstrom, assistant manager. “There is a lot of heart and soul on these plates,” she says. Gluten-free options are available too.

An attentive and knowledgeable staff greets you at the door and answers questions about the current menu, potential wine pairings and popular cocktails. The environment seen in the front of the house is echoed in the kitchen, where staff members are always experimenting with new ideas. “We have quite a few ethnic backgrounds in our kitchen and it really shows in the amazing food we put out every day,” says Bergstrom. She notes that all of the desserts are handmade each day, ensuring a fresh ending to each incredible meal.

Perfect for banquet parties, date night or a late lunch, Indochine offers beautiful dishes that will please palates of all preferences.

ANDREA LERUM

Indochine
1924 Pacific Ave, Tacoma
253.272.8200
indochinedowntown.com

Homeless Backpacks

How often do you consider whether the homeless person sleeping in an exposed area is an adolescent? Or that it may have been awhile since that homeless adolescent had a decent meal?

That’s where Homeless Backpacks comes in. The nonprofit organization provides weekend food to homeless students. According to Kelly Wilson, Homeless Backpacks chair and founding board member, the program serves more than half a dozen school districts in Washington.

The organization began with a group of women getting together in the early 2000s to discuss what they could do for the homeless. The discussion led to the plan for each person to bring a “survival” item to the next meeting to fill 20 backpacks. The program’s focus evolved to provide food on the weekend for homeless middle school and high school teens.

“Back in 2006 when we started the meal program, the food was put into plastic grocery bags,” recalls Wilson.“It was obvious that there was food in the bags, so we provided each student being served a backpack to put the weekend food bag into. The student would walk into the counselor’s office with an empty backpack and walk out with a bag of food inside.”

When plastic bags were banned in Thurston County, Wilson and her team invested in an alternative bag that is thicker and heavier. “The cost of that bag is covered by bag sponsors who pay to put their logo on the bags,” Wilson explains. “These bags are much thicker, so it is not obvious that it is a bag of food.”

Homeless Backpacks serves 573 students per week at $8 a bag. The organization doesn’t receive government or grant funding. Instead, it relies on schools, churches and businesses. It also hosts two fundraisers each year to raise money and awareness.

“Our goal for Homeless Backpacks has always been to inspire and mentor other communities to produce a similar program,” says Wilson. “We are proud to say that through our mentorship and support, there are now similar programs in Grays Harbor, Lewis, Mason and Pierce counties. We hope to reach more communities in the coming years.”

JORDAN MARIE MCCAW
Homeless Backpacks
homelessbackpacks.org

Mud Bay Pet Stores

Pet lovers across Pierce and Thurston counties are familiar with the locally owned Mud Bay Pet Stores for their all-natural food, toys, and health products for our furry friends. But are you familiar with how it all got started?

Back in 1988, Elsa Wulff bought a tiny, struggling farm store known as Kellerman’s Corner in west Olympia on Mud Bay Road on the southern end of the Salish Sea. Wulff was determined to make the little shop thrive with her indomitable spirit and years of practical knowledge from caring for goats, geese, dogs and donkeys. Joined by her son Lars and daughter Marisa, Wulff rolled up her sleeves and started transforming the tiny store into her dream, a shop focusing on healthy and natural foods for dogs, cats and other animals.

With limited access to the high-quality products that they wanted to sell, the Wulffs got creative. When the organic chicken feed couldn’t be found locally, they worked with a local farmer to produce their own. A local bagel bakery was rented on Friday nights to make organic dog cookies. By making new connections in the community to develop new products, Mud Bay began establishing itself as a company that took its products and customers seriously. This expanded into providing customer education about the wide variety of ingredients and types of foods available for pets. Mud Bay developed a series of booklets to help pet owners make informed decisions about what to feed their dogs and cats.

In the summer of 2000, Wulff and family found out that Seattle’s largest chain of small-format pet stores was going out of business. The Wulffs knew that people were going to lose their jobs and that the eight neighborhood stores wouldn’t be easily replaced by big-box pet stores. They decided to take their approach to healthy nutrition for dogs and cats to metro Seattle. The leap paid off. Now their selection of wholesome dog and cat foods has grown to more than 450 unique formulas. It continues to grow every year with many new products from Pacific Northwest vendors.

Mud Bay has been an active supporter of Puget Sound animal shelters by providing free food to thousands of adopted cats and dogs as well as donating significantly to organizations that contribute to the welfare of animals.

A lot has changed since the first shop opened 30 years ago, but Mud Bay continues to be dedicated to helping customers find the best natural foods for their dogs and cats. They know that a happy pet means a happy person, and that helps make the world a better place for everyone.

HILLARY RYAN
Mud Bay Pet Stores
mudbay.com

New Owner of Olympic Landscape

Olympic Landscape has been designing, building and servicing outdoor residential and commercial spaces in the South Sound for more than 40 years. As an expert landscape contractor, the company creates beautiful outdoor living spaces, unique gathering spaces and specially-themed gardens for homes and businesses. Now the new owner and CEO, Joe Areyano, plans to continue that legacy. He is also adding new services and products that will carry Olympic forward for at least another 40 years.

“My family started a landscape company in 1980, so I’ve been around the industry for the majority of my life,” says Areyano. “At age 16, I started learning every division of the company, from landscape retaining walls to irrigation.” After about five years, he was promoted to field manager and continued to work his way into greater responsibilities. He’s now a certified landscape professional. This hands-on experience, he says, helps him ensure that customers receive the highest-quality service.

Areyano purchased Olympic Landscape from founder Neil Hedman last fall and has already started expanding. The new owner intends to grow the company into a regional leader expanding service area and the services and products offered. Olympic has added divisions
for synthetic turf, landscape maintenance, snow and ice removal, and small works. It is also planning to take on more projects throughout Western Washington.

The growth of Olympic Landscape is good news for the community as well. The company is on target to increase the number of employees to about 50 by the end of June. Additionally, Olympic donates 10 percent of net profits to local charities and events. St. Francis House, which eases the hardships of those in need in east Pierce County, and Homeless Backpacks, which provides food to children in need for weekends and school breaks, are two that Areyano says the company is particularly proud to support.

JULIE LEYDELMEYER

Olympic Landscape
5620 112thSt E, Puyallup
253.922.7075
olympiclandscape.com

OBEE Credit Union opens Point Ruston branch

The Olympia Brewery may not be the first thing that comes to mind when you think of banking, but O Bee Credit Union wants to change that. A leader in providing innovative financial solutions for more than 60 years, O Bee announced the opening of its newest branch, a unique blend of brewpub and financial service center in Point Ruston.

O Bee’s rich history as the original credit union of the Olympia Brewery is reflected in the interior of the new building. It features a brewpub aesthetic including brick walls, wood barrels, hand- painted murals, a transaction bar accented with brass rails and local beer taps, chalkboard signage and decor reminiscent of times gone by. Historic photos of Point Ruston and Tacoma are displayed throughout. “The pub atmosphere ties in well with our history. It’s reminiscent of the old brewery tasting room where

the community met, and workers gathered after the end of a shift,” says James Collins, CEO.

This will be the sixth branch opening for O Bee and its first venture into Pierce County. “It’s exciting,” says Collins. “We’re one of the most unique credit unions in the country with products that can’t be found at most financial institutions.” In addition to an array of loan options including home and auto, O Bee offers its signature brewery credit and debit cards featuring favorite brands like Rainier and Olympia. The Berenstain Bears® Cub Account is also part of

O Bee’s selection of products. Cub Accounts provide an incentive program for young savers that’s part of a financial education program emphasizing the concepts of “Save, Share, Spend and Earn.”

“Banks shouldn’t feel cold or impersonal and having a brick-andmortar establishment is important to our membership, so we decided to have some fun with the design concept,” added Collins.

O Bee Credit Union (The Olympia Brewing Co. Employees and Families Credit Union) was started Feb. 15, 1955, by Ted McGill, who worked in the bottle house of the brewery. This full-service not-for-profit credit union, owned by its members, has five other branches located in Lacey, Tumwater, Tenino, Yelm and West Olympia. Membership is open to all Washington residents.

LEAH GROUT

For Additional Information O Bee Credit Union obee.com

 

Star Chefs On Broadway

The Pantages Theater was transformed into a 1920s speakeasy with rum runners and floozies hosting gambling games and enticing guests to try a variety of giggle waters so delicious they should have been prohibited. Dapper gents and dolled-up dames enjoyed a variety of delicious appetizers in the lobby before going into the 100-year-old theater. They were served a four-course dinner by Asado along with fine wines and dessert, and a delicious “last bite” by Corina Bakery. The entertainment continued throughout the evening with a dazzling program by EnJoy Productions.
Funds raised totaled in excess of $310,000, including the first round of seat-naming opportunities sold for the Pantages Theater renovation.

Home Spotlight: 2018 HGTV Dream Home

For its 2018 Dream Home, HGTV selected a 3,500-square-foot waterfront home in Gig Harbor with breathtaking views of Henderson Bay. After an extensive remodel, the home is nothing short of stunning. Floorto-ceiling windows in the great room showcase the waterfront. Plenty of outdoor living space ensures the new owners will enjoy the beauty of the Pacific Northwest year round.

Local contractor Choice Construction was selected as this year’s builder. We caught up with Adam Clark, president of Choice Construction, to find out what it was like to be part of such an exciting project.

What was your favorite part of the process?
Our favorite part was working with a team of professionals to properly design and build their vision. Working with a professional team of designers and builders really made all the difference. Being able to see the “behind the scenes” of a project like this was a lot of fun as well.

What is your favorite feature?
There are really too many to count. Driving down to the property surrounded by privacy, then stepping through the front door and being greeted by the view is great. The open kitchen out to the deck is also nice for entertaining.

What was the biggest challenge?
The timeline. With film crews showing up during construction, there were days with short notices, so we couldn’t work. We still had to complete everything in time for the final production crew. Having the whole team work together and make suggestions really ensured the success of the project.

What’s next for Choice Construction?
We will continue to focus on partnering with owners and architects to collaboratively build custom homes and remodels. We have a great team in place and we want to work with people to build something special.

ANDREA LERUM

For Additional Information on the HGTV Home:
hgtv.com/design/hgtv-dream-home
Choice Construction
choice-construction.com

Summer Family Travel Tips

Summer is here and we are now ready for summer travel. Dr. Ari Gilmore at Pacific Medical Centers shares these tips with you for fun and safe travel.

Sun safety:

  • Wear sunblock! This is important for long-term skin health. Apply SPF 30 or higher every two hours, or after swimming in salt water.

Water safety:

  • Avoid alcohol while boating driving or have a designated boat driver- this is important for the safety of individuals on the boat, as well as others in the water
  • Know your own human capacity with ocean currents and waves. It’s easy to get caught in a riptide if you aren’t careful. To get out, follow these steps: Relax (don’t panic), face into the waves and swim out diagonally, once you are 100 feet to the left or right, try to come out of the water again.

Physical safety:

  • Wear the right shoes for the activity, i.e. do not hike in flip flops. Keep an eye on the ground when you’re walking- it’s easy to get distracted by the sights; we see a lot of sprained ankles from patients accidentally tripping.

Food safety:

  • If you’re going to eat a meal from a food truck, observe it first to see if they have clean meal preparation surfaces, whether or not it’s a busy place can also be a sign of the likelihood of food safety. Avoid eating fresh fruit that has been prepared out of your sight. Cooked vegetables are generally alright to eat but it’s a good idea to avoid the lettuce/cabbage on your tacos. Always be sure you wash your hands with soap and water before eating.

Health/vaccines:

  • Avoiding Zika virus: Zika is endemic near the equator, in warm humid climates. Physicians recommend women wait eight weeks after departing a location where Zika might be present before attempting to get pregnant. Likewise, we recommend men wait six months after visiting, as they have the ability to transmit the disease for some time, even after symptoms have subsided.
  • Make sure you have the proper vaccines if you’re travelling abroad. Visit www.CDC.gov/travel or see a travel physician regarding malaria, typhoid and yellow fever. The CDC recently mandated that people travelling to Brazil need to receive the yellow fever vaccine. It’s best to see a physician one month prior to travel to ensure you can receive all necessary vaccines.

Tips for long flights: 

  • Jet lag has less to do with time changes and more to do with the low pressure and low oxygen levels on the aircraft. To increase your oxygen intake, drink higher volumes of water in-flight and make sure you’re properly hydrated the days leading up. Also avoid drinking alcohol on the flight to avoid dehydration.
  • Get up from your seat every few hours to stretch your legs and do a few calf squeezes to increase blood flow