Exercise Offers Health Benefits at Any Age

Most of us have heard the adage that it’s never too late to start exercising and reap the benefits of better health. Is that a myth or a fact? Two recently published investigational studies evaluated more than 315,000 Americans and 15,000 Britons. The studies confirmed the conclusion of past research: Adopting an exercise routine at any age improves your overall health and well-being.

In the American study, researchers were surprised by one of their findings. Participants who increased their physical activity in their 40s, 50s and into their early 60s enjoyed health benefits and a reduced risk of an early death as much as those who had maintained an exercise regimen throughout adulthood.

The British study found similar benefits for people into their late 70s. The researchers also concluded that substantial longevity benefits were gained by becoming more physically active regardless of past inactivity or health conditions, such as high blood pressure, elevated cholesterol or obesity.

Ready to get started exercising? The Cleveland Clinic recommends these steps:

See your doctor.

Get a physical exam to assess your current fitness level. Make sure you’re healthy enough to start picking up the pace.

Track your progress.

Use a pedometer or activity tracker to count your steps. Time your workouts with a stopwatch. Keep a journal to show how far you’ve come as you progress.

Start slow.

Begin all workouts with a warm-up and stretching.

Find the right fit.

Figure out what activities you enjoy. Create a balanced routine to include aerobics, strength training and balance exercises.

Self-assess.

Evaluate whether your workouts are too little or too much. Take note of your fatigue level and your ability to lift and to walk distances.

Hydrate and eat a balanced diet.

Drink plenty of water every day. Plan meals and snacks that are high in fiber and well-balanced with “good” calories to fuel your body.

JULIE LEYDELMEYER

Find Relief from Back Pain Close to Home

Most adults can recall a time when they’ve felt back pain. It’s one of the most common medical complaints to physicians. Georgetown University’s Institute for Health Care Research and Policy reports that some 16 million adults have persistent or chronic back pain. That’s 8% of all adults. As a result they are limited in certain everyday activities. People with back pain may miss work, feel downhearted and be less involved in social activities.

“When your back pain is to the point that it’s impacting your quality of life and you’re ready to do something about it, it’s time to get evaluated,” says Dr. Zachary Abbott, D.O. He is one of the fellowship-trained spine physicians at Olympia Orthopaedic Associates’ Comprehensive Spine Center. The specialty center saves patients from running around town for multiple appointments. Instead, they can have quick and easy access, all under one roof, to tests and procedures that aid in a diagnosis. The center’s diagnostic tools include X-ray, ultrasound and MRI.

Abbott is board-certified in physical medicine and rehabilitation, electrodiagnostic medicine, sports medicine, and pain medicine. “I see my role as an educator,” he explains. His goal is to assess what’s wrong and help the patient understand the issue. Then he presents all of the treatment options and helps the patient determine which one is the best fit.

One significant advantage of the Comprehensive Spine Center, according to Abbott, is that he and his colleagues are able to collaborate regularly about treatment plans for patients. This helps ensure that each individual receives the highest level of care.

For most patients, he says, nonsurgical treatments are the first step. When surgery is called for, patients can turn to the spine center’s orthopaedic and neurological surgeons, who are at the top of their fields. They specialize in back, neck and spine care using advanced techniques. These include minimally invasive, robot-assisted surgery.

“We’re committed to providing patients with excellent care that rivals that of larger cities,” says Abbott. As evidence of that commitment, a new stand-alone facility is being constructed next to Olympia Orthopaedic’s Westside Clinic for the Comprehensive Spine Center. Completion of the building is expected in 18 to 24 months.

JULIE LEYDELMEYER

For Additional Information

Olympia Orthopaedic Associates

3901 Capital Mall Dr SW, Olympia

360.709.6230

olyortho.com

Girlfriends’ Autumn Getaway

Nothing says fall fun like a girls trip to Bellevue. From shopping to dining to outside adventures, this weekend escape offers plenty of options.

For your weekend stay, check into the brand-new Hilton Garden Inn. It’s conveniently located downtown just minutes from great shopping, dining and more. This clean, bright, modern hotel includes a stylish lobby, conference rooms, and a pool and balcony overlooking the city.

Satisfy your appetite at The Lakehouse at Lincoln Square South. Dining at this farmhouse-chic restaurant will make you feel like you are enjoying a delicious meal at your friend’s lake house. Its fresh seasonal menu, which changes every six weeks, will keep you coming back.

Stroll around and enjoy shopping, mingling and more at Bellevue Square. Take in the sunset views at Meydenbauer Bay Park. Kayaking rentals are available.

Chef Joel Handshuh says he loves to cook “by inspiration.” And that inspiration comes from the freshest foods available. The Lakehouse menu offers a lovely pairing of thoughtful cuisine and cocktails that will tantalize your taste buds. The restaurant also serves breakfast and lunch weekdays and brunch on the weekends.

Stop in for a bite and a distinctly different sip at Third Culture Coffee. This artistic and globally themed shop features hot and cold brew from around the world. Ask about the avocado and kaya toast. A well-known snack in Singapore and Malaysia, kaya is akin to a coconut jam.

At Central Bar + Restaurant, Sundays are fun days with DJ music and games. Any day of the week, you can take in the upbeat, hip and lively atmosphere, with menus to match for breakfast, lunch and dinner. We loved the cauliflower appetizer and the Buddha bowl for a fresh option.

LEAH GROUT

For Additional Information

Hilton Garden Inn
10777 NE 10th St
425.454.0070
hiltongardeninn3.hilton.com

The Lakehouse
10455 NE 5th Pl
425.454.7076
thelakehousebellevue.com

Bellevue Square .;,
575 Bellevue Square
bellevuecollection.com

Meydenbauer Bay Park
419 98th Ave NE

Third Culture Coffee
80 102nd Ave NE
425.230.3660
thirdculturecoffee.com

Central Bar + Restaurant
10475 NE 6th St
425.578.7878
centralbar.com

Recycled Stylemaker: Lost & Found Crafts

Lost & Found Crafts has created the best of both worlds: a place to shop for any craft supply imaginable and a place where materials are given a “second chance” instead of being thrown away.

“I’ve been doing crafts since I was a little kid,” says owner Michelle Isaacson. “My sister taught me how to cross-stitch when I was 8 years old.” When her life got busier, crafts were set on the back burner until she got a little older. By then, however, she had moved on from cross-stitch, to crafts like making Christmas ornaments out of Mason jars.

Isaacson’s new interests in crafts led her to brand-name stores like Michaels and Jo-Ann, where the supplies were much more expensive. She said to herself, “This is ridiculous. There’s gotta be a cheaper way to do this.” A friend in Indiana had a secondhand craft store, which led Isaacson to look for something similar nearby. The closest ones were in Seattle and Portland. There was nothing in Olympia. “Well, there we go,” she said, “I always wanted to own my own small business. Why not just do it now?”

Lost & Found Crafts offers any type of supply customers might need for their projects. Most of the supplies donated are gently used or brand-new. When Isaacson first opened her doors, she was unsure whether enough donations would come her way. Now she’s overwhelmed with the amount of supplies she has building up in the store.

“It’s been amazing,” she says. “At the beginning I was going to garage sales. But now the store is full, my garage is full, and I have a balcony outside full of things. Every day, people come in and drop off items to donate.”

More than anything, Isaacson wants shoppers at Lost & Found Crafts to feel relaxed and comfortable in asking questions.

“I also want people to feel more like part of a community,” she says. One of the most rewarding parts of the store so far, she adds, has been the conversations she’s had with her customers, even if they’re not about crafting. “I also want to give back, and I want my customers to help. Let’s come together and do things for both the environment and for our community,” says Isaacson.

JORDAN MARIE MCCAW

For Additional Information

Lost and Found Crafts

2316 4th Ave East, Olympia

lostandfoundcrafts.com

New Fall Looks and Fashion Trends

We are now ready to think of warm camel coats and chic leather boots. We can’t help but bring you the trends that are set to be huge this fall. Some of them are already gaining momentum right now.

It’s a ‘cinch.’

Strong, structured, cinched-waist suits make their way from the office to the street and show off your curves this fall.

Green light.

Pistachio is the color set to dominate this autumn. Every variation of the pretty green hue was seen from head-to-toe on the Fall/Winter ’19 runways. There were silky verdant looks along with minty green maxi dresses and beanies. The look feels modern and refreshing—and it’s inspiring us to run out and buy a pistachio outfit or accessory ASAP.

Fur sure.

Faux furs are in just about all of the designer collections for fall. The looks are dressy, sporty and elegant. The most popular faux furs are well-designed and impeccably tailored. They look like real furs.

A new boot.

Want to impress your friends? The colored sock boot is so in and can transition from the office to after-work gatherings. It’s available in an array of colors this fall.

Puff piece no more.

So long, puffer jackets—at least for now. We’re loving the idea of an oversized quilted coat for the fall months. Being less billowy, it can be tied with a belt, or it can be left loose too. Either approach to the upcoming outerwear trend is super chic.

LEAH GROUT

Canterwood Kitchen Made Glamorous

Designing a functional and beautiful space in all-white is no easy task. Yet a pair of Puget Sound–based designers, Alinda Morris of Alinda Morris Interior Design and Martin Lyons, met this design challenge in a stunning fashion. The project was an outdated ’90s kitchen and dining area, which was “underwhelming and without any main focal point,” according to Morris. The dynamic duo transformed it into a chic space that is as lovely to look at as it is livable.

The kitchen was in great shape but the colors were dated and the client desired a light and bright glamorous kitchen that was an extension of her living and dining space. Morris retained the existing cabinet frames but had new maple cabinet doors made and painted. Oversized hardware from Restoration Hardware was added for visual weight.

The designers selected materials for their durability. Countertops are Taj Mahal quartzite, from Stone Source. White leather barstools are easy to wipe clean. The dining room table is topped with reclaimed wood that already boasts plenty of its own imperfections and thus personality. The silver cowhide rug beneath it is “surprisingly easy to maintain,” Morris says.

The job was not all about practicality, though. Lighting sets the tone for the space. Morris saved the biggest splurges for items that hang overhead. “I love the lighting in this project. The large pendants over the kitchen island and the crystal chandelier over the dining table really add shine.”

Morris’s design proves that a white-on-white color scheme can be interesting and layered. “I’m happy when I see the client using the space. I know this space will look even better over time.” Glamourous and durable were the goals achieved with this design.

LEAH GROUT

For Additional Information

Interior design furniture by Martin Lyons

Kitchen and lighting design by Alinda Morris Interior Design

Photos by Alex Hayden

Take Your Appetite on Your Next Trip to Mt. Rainier

A visit to Mt. Rainier in the fall is like no other. The colors are breathtaking, and that’s not all. If you’re planning a visit soon, and you love tasty, fresh food, consider spending the day on a chef-led, farm-to-table tour.

The tour will have you gathering ingredients from local micro farms, farmstead creameries and award-winning local butcheries. You’ll meet the farmers and ranchers and learn firsthand about organic farming, sustainable farming, the art of cheese-making and butchery. The full-day tour concludes with a special dinner from the foraged finds, prepared by Chef Ky Loop.

“Chef Ky,” as he is locally known, is passionate about cooking. “Food, especially good food, speaks to your soul,” he says. “So many things in our lives revolve around food. Just like our ancient ancestors huddled around the fire (where the cooking happened), so do we in a sense (party guests always end up in the kitchen). During a chef-led, farm-to-table tour, we provide the food, you provide the party, and together we’ll create a lasting memory.”

The day starts with everyone meeting at a local coffee shop about 9 a.m. From there the group heads off to visit the farms and meet the farmers. Participants learn what the farmers do, enjoy tastings and then select ingredients for dinner. Some of the places in the tour include Fantello Farmstead Creamery, Mason Jar Farm or Cedar Spring Farm, Olson’s Meats & Smokehouse, L & B Mini Ranch, and a local brewery or two.

The tour wraps up between 2 and 3 p.m. and then everyone enjoys some free time exploring the area or relaxing while Chef Ky prepares dinner. About 5:30, the group gathers at Pursuit Distilling Company to dine together and talk about what they’re eating, how the ingredients were used, and so on. It’s a delicious experience to be sure.

KELLY LENIHAN

For Additional Information

Chef-Led Food Tours with Chef Ky Loop

253.569.7150

chefky.com

Northwest Fresh: In the Mood for Sushi?

Sushi is cultural and artistic and can be wonderfully addictive. The Japanese dish begins with bite-sized cakes of cold boiled rice flavored with rice vinegar. The cakes are rolled in seaweed with, or topped with, raw fish, vegetables or egg. Sushi does not always mean raw fish. But raw fish—sashimi in Japanese—is the most popular ingredient in sushi.

What makes sushi great is the simplicity of the food and the complexity of the flavor. Serious sushi chefs study for decades to master these tasty bites. The ingredients for makizushi (sushi rolls) are chosen so that taste, texture and even colors complement each other. The rolls are served sliced into disks so diners can see the artistic work inside.

At traditional omakase-style places, you can usually order a set of sushi with a fixed price. Or you can order your favorite sushi pieces as you eat your meal. Sushi connoisseurs recommend that nigiri, a slice of fish atop a strip of rice, is best enjoyed by turning it upside down to place the fish side on the tongue.

Ready to tantalize your taste buds with delectable Japanese delicacies? Here’s a list of sushi spots in the South Sound.

LACEY

Koibito
730 Sleater Kinney Rd SE
sushiolympia.com

OLYMPIA

Aya Sushi
1540 Cooper Point Rd SW

Osaka
7265 Martin Way East
osakajapanese.com

Red Wind Casino—Seafood Restaurant
12819 Yelm Hwy SE
redwindcasino.com/dining/seafood-restaurant

PUYALLUP

Forever Sushi
4301 South Meridian
fspuyallup.com

Sushi & Wok
5610 176th St East

Sushi Ari
206 39th Ave SW
sushiari.com

GIG HARBOR

Domo Sushi
4901 Point Fosdick Dr NW
domosushi.co

Mizu Steakhouse
3116 Judson St
mizusteakhouse.com

TACOMA

Gari of Sushi
1209 South 38th St
gariofsushi.net

Mio Sushi
5051 Main St
miosushi.com

Sushi Tama
3919 6th Ave
sushitamarestaurant.com

Sushido
1620 South Mildred St
sushidowa.com

The Koi
1552 Commerce St
thekoitacoma.com

LAKEWOOD

Hanilkwan Sushi & Grill
3615 Steilacoom Blvd SW

Jin Sushi
8904 South Tacoma Way
jinsushi.multiscreensite.com

UNIVERSITY PLACE

Sapporo Steakhouse
3810 Bridgeport Way West
sapporosteakhouse.com

KELLY LENIHAN

Olympia Goat Dairy Crafts Award-Winning Cheeses

“We like to say that our cheese is a love letter to our community.” In this simple statement, Rachel Taylor-Tuller encapsulates the spirit of Lost Peacock Creamery. She’s a first-generation farmer, veteran and chief milkmaid at the creamery. Her husband, Matthew, is known as the head cheesemaker. At the couple’s micro dairy in Olympia, Lost Peacock hand-crafts “ridiculously fabulous cheese” from the milk of goats.

“I fell in love with goats and thought about what job I could do that would let me own all the goats,” explains Taylor-Tuller. She’s only half joking. A goat diary was what she landed on, even though the couple had no prior farming experience.

“It’s very hard for first-generation farmers to break into dairy,” she says. Lost Peacock is required to adhere to the same regulations, licensing and infrastructure of a large commercial goat dairy, even though it is a fraction of the size.

Despite the many challenges, Lost Peacock takes great pride in raising and caring for its goat herd. The goats eat organic alfalfa. Each one is named, usually by the couple’s 3- and 5-year-old children. And the individual goat personalities are catered to when it’s time for milking.

“We have 100% control over our milk, which is important because that’s the source of the food we’re eating,” says Taylor-Tuller. “We believe that because our goats have such amazing lives, the milk they give us is that much better.”

The combination of clean living and lots of love transforms the goats’ milk into two types of chevre—plain and Thai garlic—and halloumi. These are sold at more than 30 grocers from Olympia to Lynnwood. In 2018 the Thai garlic chevre and halloumi earned top honors at the Washington Artisan Cheesemakers Festival as the second- and third-place winners of the People’s Choice Award. The competition included 80 cheeses presented by 18 cheesemakers.

Lost Peacock Creamery also offers opportunities to get up close and personal with its goats, chickens, peacocks, pigs and other farm animals. Goat yoga, baby goat cuddling, cheesemaking classes, day camps for kids and special events are available throughout the year.

JULIE LEYDELMEYER

For Additional Information

Lost Peacock Creamery

5504 Cross Creek Lane NE, Olympia

360.280.6730

lostpeacock.com

An Evening with Taj Mahal Quartet

One of the most prominent and influential musicians of blues and roots music brings heart and soul to the stage. Taj Mahal Quartet will perform at the Washington Center for the Performing Arts in Olympia on Wednesday, Nov. 20, at 7:30 p.m.

A self-taught singer and songwriter, Taj Mahal plays the guitar, banjo and harmonica, among other instruments. His decades of recording and touring have nearly singlehandedly reshaped the definition and scope of the blues. He has accomplished this with the infusion of exotic sounds from around the world. His global fusion approach weaves in reggae, Caribbean, Cajun, R&B, West African folk, jazz, calypso, traditional country blues and Hawaiian slack key.

At the 13th Annual Americana Honors and Awards, the two-time Grammy-winning singer, songwriter, film composer, guitarist and multi-instrumentalist was feted with the Lifetime Achievement Award for Performance.

“What inspires me most about my career,” says Mahal, “is that I’ve been able to make a living playing the music that I always loved and wanted to play since the early ’50s. I am extremely lucky to have fans who have listened to the music I choose to play and have stayed with me for 50 years. It’s very exciting, to say the least.”

As in ancient culture, he adds, the people are as much a part of the performance as the music. “Live communication through music—oh yeah, it’s right up there with oxygen!”

JESSICA CALDWELL

For Additional Information

The Washington Center for the Performing Arts

360.753.8586

washingtoncenter.org