Exercise Offers Health Benefits at Any Age

Most of us have heard the adage that it’s never too late to start exercising and reap the benefits of better health. Is that a myth or a fact? Two recently published investigational studies evaluated more than 315,000 Americans and 15,000 Britons. The studies confirmed the conclusion of past research: Adopting an exercise routine at any age improves your overall health and well-being.

In the American study, researchers were surprised by one of their findings. Participants who increased their physical activity in their 40s, 50s and into their early 60s enjoyed health benefits and a reduced risk of an early death as much as those who had maintained an exercise regimen throughout adulthood.

The British study found similar benefits for people into their late 70s. The researchers also concluded that substantial longevity benefits were gained by becoming more physically active regardless of past inactivity or health conditions, such as high blood pressure, elevated cholesterol or obesity.

Ready to get started exercising? The Cleveland Clinic recommends these steps:

See your doctor.

Get a physical exam to assess your current fitness level. Make sure you’re healthy enough to start picking up the pace.

Track your progress.

Use a pedometer or activity tracker to count your steps. Time your workouts with a stopwatch. Keep a journal to show how far you’ve come as you progress.

Start slow.

Begin all workouts with a warm-up and stretching.

Find the right fit.

Figure out what activities you enjoy. Create a balanced routine to include aerobics, strength training and balance exercises.

Self-assess.

Evaluate whether your workouts are too little or too much. Take note of your fatigue level and your ability to lift and to walk distances.

Hydrate and eat a balanced diet.

Drink plenty of water every day. Plan meals and snacks that are high in fiber and well-balanced with “good” calories to fuel your body.

JULIE LEYDELMEYER

Find Relief from Back Pain Close to Home

Most adults can recall a time when they’ve felt back pain. It’s one of the most common medical complaints to physicians. Georgetown University’s Institute for Health Care Research and Policy reports that some 16 million adults have persistent or chronic back pain. That’s 8% of all adults. As a result they are limited in certain everyday activities. People with back pain may miss work, feel downhearted and be less involved in social activities.

“When your back pain is to the point that it’s impacting your quality of life and you’re ready to do something about it, it’s time to get evaluated,” says Dr. Zachary Abbott, D.O. He is one of the fellowship-trained spine physicians at Olympia Orthopaedic Associates’ Comprehensive Spine Center. The specialty center saves patients from running around town for multiple appointments. Instead, they can have quick and easy access, all under one roof, to tests and procedures that aid in a diagnosis. The center’s diagnostic tools include X-ray, ultrasound and MRI.

Abbott is board-certified in physical medicine and rehabilitation, electrodiagnostic medicine, sports medicine, and pain medicine. “I see my role as an educator,” he explains. His goal is to assess what’s wrong and help the patient understand the issue. Then he presents all of the treatment options and helps the patient determine which one is the best fit.

One significant advantage of the Comprehensive Spine Center, according to Abbott, is that he and his colleagues are able to collaborate regularly about treatment plans for patients. This helps ensure that each individual receives the highest level of care.

For most patients, he says, nonsurgical treatments are the first step. When surgery is called for, patients can turn to the spine center’s orthopaedic and neurological surgeons, who are at the top of their fields. They specialize in back, neck and spine care using advanced techniques. These include minimally invasive, robot-assisted surgery.

“We’re committed to providing patients with excellent care that rivals that of larger cities,” says Abbott. As evidence of that commitment, a new stand-alone facility is being constructed next to Olympia Orthopaedic’s Westside Clinic for the Comprehensive Spine Center. Completion of the building is expected in 18 to 24 months.

JULIE LEYDELMEYER

For Additional Information

Olympia Orthopaedic Associates

3901 Capital Mall Dr SW, Olympia

360.709.6230

olyortho.com

K9 Security Program at MultiCare

MultiCare Tacoma General Hospital has launched a new K9 security program to provide an added level of safety for patients, visitors and staff. 

“Emotions can run high in hospital settings,” said Sharon Oxendale, President/COO of MultiCare Tacoma General/Allenmore Hospitals. “Having a K9 presence is sometimes all you need to diffuse emotional situations that sometimes occur in emergency rooms.”

At the center of the program is a three-year-old German Shepherd named Officer Ben and a K9 security officer named Brian Phillips. 

During a three-month pilot program, they helped reduce the number of assaults by 33 percent when compared to the same 90-day period in 2018.

“We interacted with hundreds of staff members, patients and visitors and I can’t remember a single person who had a negative reaction to Ben,” said Phillips. “A lot of people refer to him as a ‘rock star’ and are clearly happy to have him around.”

In addition to helping de-escalate more than 60 incidents during the pilot program, Ben also provided inspiration and comfort to some of the hospital’s patients, including young children that were facing stressful situations.

“It was really gratifying to see Ben interacting with some of the kids – and really a lot of adults too – who were facing tough situations and just wanted some down time to hang with Ben,” said MultiCare’s Regional Director of Security Services, Emergency Management and Business Continuity Radford Garrison. “Animals like Ben can have a calming effect and can help bring smiles to kids who might otherwise feel overly emotional.”

MultiCare is looking to add another dog to the canine unit by the end of this fall with patrols at both Auburn Medical Center and Covington Medical Center. Leah Grout

Wesley Opens Bradley Park location

Wesley is observing its 75th year with the grand opening of its third senior-living community, Wesley Bradley Park in Puyallup. The public is invited to enjoy music, hors d’oeuvres, giveaways and prize drawings at the celebration on Sunday, Aug. 25 at 1 p.m. 

“We are excited about the opportunities to develop relationships throughout the area,” says T.C. Fraser, campus administrator. “Our residents have been highly active in various community activities. This has really opened the door to many others who now call Wesley Bradley Park their home.” 

The 19-acre property on South Hill features a range of residential options. The Lodge, five stories high, includes 99 independent living residences. For assisted living–like services, there is The Commons, with 50 apartments. The Brownstone offers 32 condo-style homes. The memory care neighborhood, called The Arbor, will open with 17 apartments once state licensing has been approved. 

At the grand opening, guests are welcome to tour the community. They will see Wesley’s style of senior living, one that is full of choices. Wesley is known for its network of services. These include independent and assisted living, in-home care, skilled nursing, memory care and rehabilitative therapies. This means residents can live with as many or as few supportive services as they need. 

In addition to living and health services, Wesley Bradley Park residents have access to amenities that were developed with a wide range of interests in mind. These include a fully equipped health and wellness center, a learning center/theater, multiple dining venues, a creative arts center, a wood shop, a chapel/auditorium, a beauty salon, a club room and a library.

Fraser adds that the Wesley Bradley Park community will continue to grow and expand. An additional Brownstone apartment building is in the plan, as is a state-of-the-art post-acute rehabilitation center.

by leah grout

707 39th Ave SE, Puyallup, WA 98374

253.435.8100

wesleychoice.org/communities/bradley-park

FoxFire Salon and Spa Celebrates 35 Years

Tenacity and perseverance are two traits that have helped FoxFire Salon and Spa reach an impressive milestone—35 years in business. “It was never my intention to be a business owner,” said Karin Walker, founder and owner. “I just wanted to work with my friends doing great hair and having fun in a really nice environment.”

“I was 26 years old and needed $25,000 for the build-out of my first location,” Walker recalled. “I kept getting turned down because the bankers didn’t think I knew what I was doing, and they were right!” Young and fearless, the aspiring salon owner kept applying. Eventually she found the right lender, who by happenstance was also her client. Walker’s parents offered their home as collateral.

The founder’s vision of a high-end salon was the catalyst for FoxFire. The business opened on Feb. 14, 1984, in leased space at the intersection of Center and Orchard Streets in Tacoma. Walker credits her six original employees with playing a huge role in the salon’s overall success. Two still work with her in a staff that now numbers close to 30.

Though Walker describes her start as unintentional, she has kept a keen eye to the future. In 2001 she moved the business to its Fircrest location. She built this salon from the ground up. In 2009 she heard a rumor that a prime location in the Proctor District might soon be available. She contacted the building owner to say she was interested. Just a few months later, she opened this second location.

“It’s been quite the journey, but I’ve enjoyed it,” said Walker. “I’m a people person and have enjoyed working with my team.” She is also proud of the many awards the salons have earned over the years. Most memorable was being recognized in 2013 by Salon Today, the top business publication for owners of salons and spas. FoxFire made its list of the top 200 salons in the country.

JULIE LEYDELMEYER

For Additional Information

FoxFire Salon and Spa

1912 65th Ave W, Tacoma

2701 North Proctor St, Tacoma

253.565.7765

foxfiresalon.com

Body Condition Scoring for Dogs & Cats

Many dog and cat owners may not be familiar with body condition scoring. But Amanda Evans, manager at Mud Bay Pet Supply, uses it regularly to evaluate her own dog’s health. We talked to Evans about the concept and about evaluating your own dog or cat’s weight.

MB: As humans, we often use the scale to evaluate our weight. Why use the body condition score at Mud Bay?

AE: The body condition score is about the shape of your dog or cat. Healthy weight is about having a proportionate body. A Basset hound that weighs 60 pounds is going to look different from a Labrador that weighs the same. The body condition score is a more effective way to talk about weight.

Humans, too, consider height, and also body mass index. We look at where we’re carrying weight and if that weight is muscle or fat.

MB: Let’s say I want to evaluate my dog or cat’s body condition score. How do I figure out if she scores a healthy three?

AE: It all comes down to appearance and feel. Look at the top of the animal and look for a clear “waist” definition. An animal should have some curve when looking at the back. It should not have just a straight line from chest to hips. You also want to see an abdominal “tuck” from the side. The stomach should form a diagonal line from chest to the back legs and hips. Feel for the ribs. Dogs and cats have varying amounts of hair, but you should be able to feel the ribs as clearly as you can feel the bones in the back of your hand. If the ribs are really obvious, the animal is scored under a three. If you can barely feel the ribs, or can’t feel them at all, the animal is over a three.

MB: What if I don’t feel comfortable assessing body condition on my own?

AE: Take your animal to someone in animal health care that you feel comfortable talking to, whether in a store or at an animal hospital. Don’t be ashamed if your dog or cat gets a bit over a three or is a bit under. It is easy enough to fix. At Mud Bay, we care about weight because a healthy weight can dramatically increase an animal’s lifespan and its quality of life.

COURTESY OF MUD BAY

For Additional Information

blog.mudbay.com/quick-tips-for-figuring-out-your-dog-or-catsbody- condition-score

Linnea’s Unique Boutique Continues to Grow

Linnea Grantham dreamed of one day following in her father’s footsteps. “My father owned a European gift shop just outside of Boston and my sisters and I practically grew up in the shop,” recalls Grantham. “I always wanted to have a gift shop of my own one day.”

Grantham’s opportunity came knocking in the fall of 2015. Capital Medical Center in Olympia was looking for a vendor to establish an independently owned gift shop at the hospital. Grantham, who also owns a successful promotional products company with her husband, enthusiastically answered. “It was one of the scariest and most exciting decisions I’ve made because it had always just been a dream,” she says. “But I knew I had to try.”

Linnea’s Unique Boutique, opened in December 2015, quickly garnered rave reviews from hospital staff and the general public. The shop’s 300-square-foot space is filled wall-to-wall with fun and eclectic gifts, a little sarcastic humor and plush animals. “I only stock things that I would personally buy,” the owner explains. “I love everything in here.”

About a year after opening, the shop’s popularity got the attention of Overlake Medical Center in Bellevue. Grantham was invited to open a second shop. “I’ve always said that Linnea’s is not your typical ‘hospital gift shop,’ but a gift shop that happens to be in a hospital.”

The Overlake space is more than twice the size of the Olympia location. Their distance apart of nearly 70 miles, with a lot of freeway traffic, makes running the two locations geographically challenging. But, says Grantham, “I have a wonderful, supportive staff at both shops, who I can’t say enough good about. They make it all possible.”

In April, Linnea’s opens in a third location, the Lacey/Hawks Prairie area. Customers will be delighted at the new shop, says Grantham. They will find items that are offered only in the Lacey shop.

JULIE LEYDELMEYER

For Additional Information

Linnea’s Unique Boutique

3900 Capital Mall Dr SW, Olympia
facebook.com/LinneasDreamOlympia

1035 116th Ave NE, Bellevue
facebook.com/LinneasDreamBellevue

6715 Martin Way E, Lacey
facebook.com/LinneasDreamLacey

Public Market at Point Ruston

CHI Franciscan and Point Ruston are proud to announce that CHI Franciscan’s Northwest Healthy campaign will be the lead sponsor of The Public Market at Point Ruston. This partnership, through the campaign’s commitment to nurturing the community’s well-being, will support the new public market and provide wellness education and interactive opportunities to live Northwest Healthy lives.

The Public Market at Point Ruston will feature two prominent Northwest Healthy spaces, including the Northwest Healthy Demonstration Kitchen and the Northwest Healthy Event Kitchen. The Northwest Healthy Demonstration Kitchen will provide an open, inviting space for local market vendors to showcase their products, work with local chefs, interact with people, and allow shoppers to watch, ask questions, and get recipes. The Northwest Healthy Event Kitchen will offer a full kitchen, open seating area, and the ability to transform the space for community and private meetings and events.

“We are committed to our mission of creating healthier communities by supporting programs and resources that encourage a healthy lifestyle.” said Ketul J. Patel, CEO of CHI Franciscan. Their partnership with Point Ruston, Patel says, “will provide our neighbors and families with an environment that promotes incorporating healthy habits into their daily lives.”

“Fresh food is an essential ingredient to a Northwest Healthy lifestyle, and the kitchens will help the community explore the important relationship between food and nutrition,” says Holly Martindale, registered dietitian at St. Joseph Medical Center. “Making healthy choices when shopping and learning how to prepare delicious, well-balanced meals will keep individuals and their families healthy for generations to come.”

Built across 97 acres, Point Ruston is a waterfront resort-inspired village that encourages people to walk, bike, and be active. Building vibrant community spaces is the central component of Point Ruston – and a key element to creating Northwest Healthy communities.

“Our vision from the beginning was to convert and repurpose this beautiful waterfront property, reclaiming it from its industrial past and creating a place where kids, families, visitors and the community alike can play, eat, and relax as part of a healthy lifestyle,” said Point Ruston’s Managing Director Loren Cohen. “Point Ruston is excited and appreciative of CHI Franciscan’s support to bring this vision to reality.”

More information on how to request to use the Northwest Healthy Demonstration Kitchen or the Northwest Healthy Event Kitchen will be announced in early Fall 2019.

For more information:

www.chifranciscan.org

https://www.pointruston.com/


MARTINA PRESTON


Warm-Weather Wellness Tips for Seniors

Warmer weather often awakens a desire to get outside and be active. But seniors who have a higher sensitivity to heat need to use caution when making plans in the sun.

Put on Your Walking Shoes

Walking is an excellent physical activity. And doing so in a park or forest is a great way to connect with nature. Joining a group can also be an easy way to meet new friends. Choose terrain—and supportive shoes—suitable for your activity level and balance.

Take an Exercise Class

Get your endorphins flowing! Yoga, pilates or tai chi can all improve balance and flexibility, decreasing the chance of falling. Water aerobics is good for those with arthritis or chronic pain. Or try low-impact sports such as horseshoes, miniature golf, bocce ball, bean bags, badminton or croquet.

Get Outside and Garden

Gardening can be as calming and relaxing as an hour of meditation. Digging, planting and weeding can improve strength, flexibility and agility. If you don’t have a garden, consider volunteering at a local park.

Lighten Up Your Diet

With fruits and vegetables coming into season, it’s time to enjoy salads, light soups and other lighter fare. Farmers markets provide an opportunity to get outdoors and select healthful foods for dinner.

Stay Hydrated

As we age, our ability to notice thirst may decrease, so keep an eye on your water intake, especially when you’re outdoors in the sun. At home, drink water and herbal tea rather than other beverages.

Watch for Allergies

Summertime can mean allergy season, so pay attention to allergy forecasts. Untreated allergies are uncomfortable and can lead to breathing problems or sinus infections. Your doctor can recommend or prescribe a treatment to help prevent serious respiratory problems.

Check the Side Effects of Your Prescriptions

Some medications increase sun sensitivity. Find out whether you need to take extra precautions. Following other suggestions on this list will help you avoid problems.

Relish the Outdoors

Enjoy the great outdoors with a picnic! Just remember to pick an area with comfortable seating and shade, even if it’s in your own backyard. Bird-watching and photography are two other pastimes to stimulate the mind and body. If you love to shop, flea markets are a fun summertime activity. Just remember to protect yourself with sunglasses, a wide-brimmed hat, sunscreen and bug repellent.

KELLY LENIHAN

Service at the Heart of Light Dental Studios

We can all agree on the qualities for the ideal dental provider: round-the-clock service, free consultations, same-day appointments, entire-family bookings, empathetic service and affordable care. It’s nearly impossible to find a full combination of such attributes. But then there’s Light Dental Studios.

Based in Puyallup, the dentist-owned company—with 14 locations, 37 dentists and more than 180 employees in the South Puget Sound—has customer service at the core of its mission.

“We try to treat people the way we would want to be treated,” says owner and CEO Dr. Steven Broughton, who bought his first office from a former dentist in Puyallup in 1997. “People say our practice feels like we’re all neighbors, like they’re just going down the street for friendly dental care.”

With hours from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. including Saturdays, doctors available 24/7, free consultations, same-day appointments, and entire-family same-day care, Light Dental Studios has solutions patients need. “We’re trying to make dentistry effortless by making it about our patients, not the dentists,” says Broughton. “Our schedule accommodates their schedule, not the other way around. Our doctors are always available, and almost all procedures are done in-house.”

Besides standard dental checkups, treatments and other services, Light Dental Studios offers on-site orthodontics, implants, surgeries and dentures. Children’s dental care is also offered. In fact, the offices frequently schedule care for entire families side-by-side on the same day to save time.

Light Dental Studios also gives back to the community at the annual South Sound Free Dental Day. That’s when the staff donates its time and skills to give away more than $90,000 worth of dental work—including fillings and extractions—on a first come, first-served basis. “We want patients to feel comfortable,” Broughton says. “Our first goal is to provide same-day treatment.” Broughton notes that Light Dental Studios will continue to add offices over the upcoming years in growing family locations.

He attributes the increasing growth of his practice to the convenience for patients of evening and Saturday hours and same-day appointments.

LEAH GROUT

LIGHT DENTAL STUDIOS
lightdentalstudios.com