A New Home for Holy Lamb Organics

The innovative and sustainable company, Holy Lamb Organics, surprises our community once again with a new location. This time, right in the heart of creative downtown Olympia! Surrounded by international cuisine, historic buildings, breweries, cafes, art stores and other clothing and home goods shops, Holy Lamb Organics fits right in.

Since 2017, the previous Olympia location was in the historic steam plant building, mere minutes from the space on Washington Street. When asked why the company decided to move, co-owner Jason Shaefer explained, “[when] the lease ended, we came here because this was more of a central spot. And we wanted to be a part of the revitalization of the downtown after all of the antics of COVID-19.”

The new space is narrow, but still spacious enough to fit all their product, including mattress displays, and walking room for social distancing. Between handmade blankets and soft bed sheet bundles is a colorful chalk board featuring the cellular structure of wool drawn by a local artist. Around the store are more art pieces by another local artist, giving the store appropriate Olympian character.

The move is working out well for the company and providing a different shopping experience than before. Most customers that visited the steam plant store were more conscious and already-decided buyers. At this central location, customers are largely walk-ins browsing the downtown. The benefit has been the profit of display settings, meeting interesting people and more involvement in a community they love.

They are becoming especially close to their neighbors, Painted Plate and Ember Goods coffee. “When customers seem to be stuck or indecisive, we will send them to Painted Plate for some creative release,” says Shaefer. “If the customer is lagging, we send them over to Ember Goods for some caffeine and vice versa. People are sent over to us to rest and test our mattresses.” Overall, the connection the company is creating with their community has been the most rewarding part of their move to central downtown.

Be sure to check out Holy Lamb Organics’ new showroom to touch and experience their all-natural product and learn about their mission to provide ethical bedding.

For Additional Information
holylamborganics.com

NATALIE BENSON

4 Trips on 2 Wheels in the Greater Olympia

The weather is now warmer and we are ready to get out of the house and explore the region on two wheels. Imagine the wind in your hair without a care as you explore the flat, paved biking trails and parks in the greater Olympia area.

  1. The Chehalis Western Trail is a quiet, scenic 22 miles heading south from Olympia. You’ll be near Olympic Crest Coffee Roasters in Lacey just about the time you get thirsty for a hot or iced beverage. Farther along the trail, take a break to explore over 100 sculptures and the maze at Monarch Sculpture Park. The Chehalis Western Trail ends at the intersection with the Yelm-Tenino Trail.
  2. Millersylvania State Park has 7 miles of bike trails to explore, a fun outing with young riders in your family. You will need a Discover Pass to enter the park.
  3. The Yelm-Tenino Trail connects several small towns along 14 miles of its eastwest route. Enjoy water views at McIntosh Lake and Cochrane Memorial Park. Stop for sweet treats at Main Street Cookie Company in Rainier and count the historic sandstone buildings in Tenino. Watch for scheduling news about the popular farmers markets in Yelm and Tenino.
  4. Farms, wineries and attractions on the Thurston Bountiful Byway have revised schedules; check before you head out. Or, follow the map and simply enjoy miles of bountiful biking and save side visits for another day.

Crown Beverage Company Expansion

When Crown Beverage Packaging, once known as Continental Can Company, opened in Olympia in 1959 its primary customer was Olympia Brewing.  Now, more than six decades later the company produces five million aluminum cans a day for the major “beverage fillers” in the region.

While production of 5 million 12 oz standard aluminum cans per day may seem like a phenomenal amount, the demand for their product is even higher.  Crown Beverage Packaging is expanding their production facility to accommodate additional high-speed manufacturing lines.

The new high-speed manufacturing line will produce an additional 4 million cans per day in the 15,000 square foot expansion as well as increase the team of 118 full-time employees by another 40 positions.   The increased capacity will allow production of newer specialty cans including a 16 oz can often containing energy drinks; a 12 oz tall slim can, and the shorter 8 oz can.

According to Tony Ellison, Plant Superintendent for Crown Beverage Packaging, “Expansion of the plant was a strategic decision.  The Olympia facility is the oldest in North America, but it is also unparalleled in efficiency.”  He added that, “There is a well-defined culture here where the employees have a lot of ownership and take pride in their work.”  

The expanded facility will host a new carbon capture unit which is designed to reduce the plant’s air emissions by 98%.  Couple the new equipment with their existing policy of using 100% recycled aluminum and Crown Beverage Packaging will improve on their sustainability goals as well as modernization.

Working hand in hand with Economic Dev Council and Thurston Co. Chambers, Ellison will proudly be commissioning the new line in July and begin running can production in August.  Joining his team will be 40 near positions, primarily “maintainers” that will be put through a rigorous training process involving more than 6,000 training hours.

Olympia and Crown Beverage were recently recognized as the Economic Development Project of the Year.  According to WEDA, the Project of the Year celebrates the successful creation of a “creative, economically significant … project in a community.”

LYNN CASTLE

Olympia Farmers Market Spring Schedule

We’ve all been looking for a way to get more involved in the community, and our local farmers markets are a perfect way to do just that! While the Olympia Farmers Market has been operating on reduced hours over the winter, we are excited to announce that the Market is, as of Thursday, April 1, returning to its “High Season” schedule. With this schedule, the Market is open from Thursday to Sunday, 10:00 am to 3:00 pm. Senior Day will once again be offered on Thursdays, with special discounts for those 55 and better. 

Though the Olympia Farmers Market has been open on Saturdays these last few months, April marks the beginning of the growing season and welcomes beautiful spring weather to enjoy. This season, the Market will feature even more vendors offering local vegetables, Washington grown fruit, prepared food, and artisan crafts. 

Online shopping continues to be available, with contactless pick up on Saturdays at the Market. For more information, visit www.olympiafarmersmarket.com.

MARTINA PRESTON

Put the right foot forward

Yearning to get outdoors for a short hike? Slip on the flip-flops and head out, right?

Wrong, says Dr. Thomas Burghardt, who is an expert in foot and ankle care. He recommends “proper shoes for the environment you’re in.” 

In May, Dr. Burghardt came to Foot and Ankle Surgical Associates (FASA) at 1901 South Union Avenue from almost two decades at the Tumwater clinic. He is a board-certified physician and surgeon specializing in foot and ankle reconstructive surgery and diabetic foot care.

Common foot problems include bunions, plantar fasciitis, peripheral artery disease and foot-related complications from diabetes. In addition, nice weather invites sprained ankles from sports activities such as basketball and hiking.

“For hiking trips, wear proper boots with support, pack moleskin and bandages and consider taking an extra pair of boots,” Dr. Burghardt said. “For casual wear, sandals are fine, but be sure they have an arch support.”

Another tip for foot care is proper hygiene, he said. Toenails should be cut straight across. The clinic does a lot of diabetic foot care, he added.

“Those with diabetes who have bad circulation don’t have good feeling in their feet and can injure themselves caring for their feet,” Dr. Burghardt said. “We treat patients for sores and wound care.”

Another area of concern is peripheral artery disease, which is caused by narrowed and hardened arteries that can reduce blood flow to the foot and ankle, he explained. People who smoke, are diabetic, have high blood pressure or high cholesterol may be at higher risk and need professional care.

Other patients need help for plantar fasciitis, which is inflammation of a thick band of tissue that connects the heel bone to the toes and causes pain near the heel. 

“A lot of foot pain comes from tight Achilles tendons,” Dr. Burghardt said. He cautioned ‘weekend warriors’ to be sure to stretch before they run and to start slowly with low mileage workouts and low impact running. 

Dr. Burghardt, a resident of Tacoma, says he is excited about a shorter commute and a chance to “meet new patients, work with a new team of colleagues and serve the Tacoma area.”

by:  EMILY HAPPY

fasafw.com

Oly on Ice

A new way to celebrate the holidays is gliding into Thurston County this winter. Oly on Ice will open on Friday, November 16 in downtown Olympia at Isthmus Park. The entire family can come out to enjoy ice skating at Olympia’s first-ever seasonal ice rink. Skaters of all ages will enjoy the warm glow of activity during the busy rush of the holiday season at the tented rink.

“Bringing structured seasonal programming to the Isthmus Park builds community, supports local business, and increases the health and well being of our citizens by providing the opportunity for physical activity during the winter months, “ notes Anna Uyeda from Olympia Parks, Arts and Recreation. “Not to mention, it’s going to be fun!”

The grand opening will take place after the Downtown for the Holidays tree lighting ceremony on November 25. Live music, special guests and more will kick of the most wonderful time of the year.

In addition there are six unique family-friendly events planned with local partners. The line up of special themed rink time includes:

Nutcracker on Ice- November 29, 4-7
Skate along side some Sugar Plum fairies or some mischievous mice when Ballet Northwest’s Nutcracker cast joins the fun. Cast members will be available for selfies.

Pride Night- December 6, 4-7
Not just limited to celebrations in June, don your rainbow attire and join Pizza Klatch for an evening welcoming everyone.

Wizards on Ice- December 13, 4-7
Certain to be popular, this event focuses on a Harry Potter theme. Community partner, South Sound Reading Foundation, invites wizards and muggles alike to a night of magical treats including trivia and prizes.

So bundle up and head down to Oly on Ice with family and friends and makes some great holiday memories.

For information on dates, times and pricing, check out www.olyonice.com

HILLARY RYAN

 

Olympia Orthopaedics Welcomes New Sports Medicine Physician

Moving to the Pacific Northwest is a new adventure for Leila Borders, MD, who is joining the team at Olympia Orthopaedics. Hailing originally from Georgia, the doctor stayed true to her southern roots when pursuing her undergraduate and graduate degrees at Emory University and Mercer University, both in her home state.

“I’m excited to make Olympia my new home,” says Borders. “I was initially worried that I might get homesick for Georgia, but when I came out to interview I was pleasantly surprised to find the plants and foliage were similar, so that helped put me at ease.”

Before starting her new role, Borders is completing her primary care sports medicine fellowship at the University of Cincinnati Medical Center. She completed her internal medicine residency at the same institution. As part of her training during the last year, she is helping college, high school and semiprofessional athletes to stay at peak performance, in addition to addressing routine health care issues and injuries.

“I enjoy sports medicine because I am able to help change a patient’s quality of life,” the doctor explains. “It’s wonderful when I can help someone with their injury or chronic joint pain and it allows them to do the things they want to do.”

One way Borders will do this in Olympia is through total joint readiness for patients preparing for joint replacement surgery. Maximizing a patient’s ability to engage in physical activity before surgery can help the patient have much better results after surgery.

The doctor is also hoping to work with both recreational and elite athletes to optimize their performance. “One of my favorite things has been working with the student athletes at a rural high school,” says Borders. “It’s such a rewarding experience helping them to improve their athleticism and I’m looking forward to doing the same in Olympia.”

Borders is certified in internal medicine by the American Board of Internal Medicine. Olympia Orthopaedic’s Westside Clinic has begun scheduling appointments for Dr. Borders.

We welcome Dr. Borders and her expertise to our community.

JULIE LEYDELMEYER

For Additional Information
Olympia Orthopaedic Associates
3901 Capital Mall Dr SW, Olympia
360.709.6230
olyortho.com

Well 80 – Olympia’s Hottest New Brewery

Well 80 Artesian Brewing Company opened its doors March 19 in downtown Olympia. Complete with a restaurant and a 10-barrel brewing system, Well 80 is a brewery and brewpub built on the site of one of Olympia’s famous artesian wells. In addition to tasty craft beers, Well 80 serves pizza, burgers and sandwiches, all with a unique twist, in its all-ages restaurant.

Co-owner Chris Knudson is enthused by revitalization efforts bringing a new sense of excitement to downtown Olympia. He also points to a number of craft breweries in the area that have surfaced in the past few years. Three Magnets Brewing, Matchless Brewing and Top Rung Brewing are joining local staple Fish Brewing Company.

“Olympia’s history is built on beer,” Knudson says. “There’s a growing brewing community here and we’re happy to be part of it.”

Knudson is speaking of Leopold Schmidt, a politician and brewer from Montana, who traveled to Olympia in 1895 to observe construction of the Washingtonstate capitol. After being introduced to Olympia’s artesian water, he proclaimed, “With this water, I can brew better beer than ever!” The next year, at the foot of Tumwater Falls, the Olympia Brewing Company was born. Its beer was made with water from the artesian wells made famous by the slogan “It’s the Water.”

At Well 80, all of its “Well Made” beers are brewed in-house by experienced brewers. The company also features a series of rotating guest taps supporting the local brewing community. You might find Triceratops Pennsyltucky Lager, Cascadia Elderberry Porter, or Whitewood Cider Co. Olivia Newtown-Jonathan cider blend.

Well 80’s goal is to follow in the footsteps of Leopold Schmidt, Paul Knight and all the other pioneers that made great beer from some of the best water in the world.

KELLY LENIHAN

For Additional Information
Well 80 Artesian Brewing
514 Fourth Ave E, Olympia
360.915.6653
well80.com

Percival Condos: Downtown Living at its Best

With an identity unrivaled by any other city in the region, Olympia is growing as a place of economic, social and development opportunity. Joining this vibrant community is Percival Condominiums, a seven-story development built with its residents—and Olympia’s character—in mind.

Percival Condominiums will be downtown Olympia’s first upscale condominium community. Located in the heart of the city near Percival Landing, this contemporary 28-home building will include five floors of residences and two floors of parking. Ten floor plans, ranging from 1,300 to 2,400 square feet, each include a spacious balcony for outdoor seating and dining.

Only eight condo units have been built in Olympia in the last 35 years, so Percival Condominiums fill a demand for people who want to live downtown and own their home. Its location makes it just a short walk from fine cuisine, shopping, entertainment and Percival Park’s boardwalk.

The ambitious project is the most recent development of the Rants Group, a longtime commercial and residential real estate company based in and focused on Thurston County.

“The development of Percival Condominiums meets a longtime call for an upscale downtown Olympia living option,” said Pat Rants, president of the Rants Group. “Thurston County lacks downtown condominiums that are deluxe and modern with incredible views. With this project, we’re giving owners unrivaled views and access to the city—simply by looking out their windows or stepping outside their front doors.”

Percival Condominiums are now pre-selling with a move-in date set for 2020. Future residents will join a lively, enriching downtown district while contributing to Olympia’s unique and evolving identity—all while enjoying breathtaking views of Puget Sound, the Olympic Mountains and the Capitol.

KELLY LENIHAN

For Additional Information
Percival Condominiums
322 Columbia St NW, Olympia
360.943.8060
percivalcondos.com