Exercise Offers Health Benefits at Any Age

Most of us have heard the adage that it’s never too late to start exercising and reap the benefits of better health. Is that a myth or a fact? Two recently published investigational studies evaluated more than 315,000 Americans and 15,000 Britons. The studies confirmed the conclusion of past research: Adopting an exercise routine at any age improves your overall health and well-being.

In the American study, researchers were surprised by one of their findings. Participants who increased their physical activity in their 40s, 50s and into their early 60s enjoyed health benefits and a reduced risk of an early death as much as those who had maintained an exercise regimen throughout adulthood.

The British study found similar benefits for people into their late 70s. The researchers also concluded that substantial longevity benefits were gained by becoming more physically active regardless of past inactivity or health conditions, such as high blood pressure, elevated cholesterol or obesity.

Ready to get started exercising? The Cleveland Clinic recommends these steps:

See your doctor.

Get a physical exam to assess your current fitness level. Make sure you’re healthy enough to start picking up the pace.

Track your progress.

Use a pedometer or activity tracker to count your steps. Time your workouts with a stopwatch. Keep a journal to show how far you’ve come as you progress.

Start slow.

Begin all workouts with a warm-up and stretching.

Find the right fit.

Figure out what activities you enjoy. Create a balanced routine to include aerobics, strength training and balance exercises.

Self-assess.

Evaluate whether your workouts are too little or too much. Take note of your fatigue level and your ability to lift and to walk distances.

Hydrate and eat a balanced diet.

Drink plenty of water every day. Plan meals and snacks that are high in fiber and well-balanced with “good” calories to fuel your body.

JULIE LEYDELMEYER

Recycled Stylemaker: Lost & Found Crafts

Lost & Found Crafts has created the best of both worlds: a place to shop for any craft supply imaginable and a place where materials are given a “second chance” instead of being thrown away.

“I’ve been doing crafts since I was a little kid,” says owner Michelle Isaacson. “My sister taught me how to cross-stitch when I was 8 years old.” When her life got busier, crafts were set on the back burner until she got a little older. By then, however, she had moved on from cross-stitch, to crafts like making Christmas ornaments out of Mason jars.

Isaacson’s new interests in crafts led her to brand-name stores like Michaels and Jo-Ann, where the supplies were much more expensive. She said to herself, “This is ridiculous. There’s gotta be a cheaper way to do this.” A friend in Indiana had a secondhand craft store, which led Isaacson to look for something similar nearby. The closest ones were in Seattle and Portland. There was nothing in Olympia. “Well, there we go,” she said, “I always wanted to own my own small business. Why not just do it now?”

Lost & Found Crafts offers any type of supply customers might need for their projects. Most of the supplies donated are gently used or brand-new. When Isaacson first opened her doors, she was unsure whether enough donations would come her way. Now she’s overwhelmed with the amount of supplies she has building up in the store.

“It’s been amazing,” she says. “At the beginning I was going to garage sales. But now the store is full, my garage is full, and I have a balcony outside full of things. Every day, people come in and drop off items to donate.”

More than anything, Isaacson wants shoppers at Lost & Found Crafts to feel relaxed and comfortable in asking questions.

“I also want people to feel more like part of a community,” she says. One of the most rewarding parts of the store so far, she adds, has been the conversations she’s had with her customers, even if they’re not about crafting. “I also want to give back, and I want my customers to help. Let’s come together and do things for both the environment and for our community,” says Isaacson.

JORDAN MARIE MCCAW

For Additional Information

Lost and Found Crafts

2316 4th Ave East, Olympia

lostandfoundcrafts.com

Canterwood Kitchen Made Glamorous

Designing a functional and beautiful space in all-white is no easy task. Yet a pair of Puget Sound–based designers, Alinda Morris of Alinda Morris Interior Design and Martin Lyons, met this design challenge in a stunning fashion. The project was an outdated ’90s kitchen and dining area, which was “underwhelming and without any main focal point,” according to Morris. The dynamic duo transformed it into a chic space that is as lovely to look at as it is livable.

The kitchen was in great shape but the colors were dated and the client desired a light and bright glamorous kitchen that was an extension of her living and dining space. Morris retained the existing cabinet frames but had new maple cabinet doors made and painted. Oversized hardware from Restoration Hardware was added for visual weight.

The designers selected materials for their durability. Countertops are Taj Mahal quartzite, from Stone Source. White leather barstools are easy to wipe clean. The dining room table is topped with reclaimed wood that already boasts plenty of its own imperfections and thus personality. The silver cowhide rug beneath it is “surprisingly easy to maintain,” Morris says.

The job was not all about practicality, though. Lighting sets the tone for the space. Morris saved the biggest splurges for items that hang overhead. “I love the lighting in this project. The large pendants over the kitchen island and the crystal chandelier over the dining table really add shine.”

Morris’s design proves that a white-on-white color scheme can be interesting and layered. “I’m happy when I see the client using the space. I know this space will look even better over time.” Glamourous and durable were the goals achieved with this design.

LEAH GROUT

For Additional Information

Interior design furniture by Martin Lyons

Kitchen and lighting design by Alinda Morris Interior Design

Photos by Alex Hayden

Olympia Goat Dairy Crafts Award-Winning Cheeses

“We like to say that our cheese is a love letter to our community.” In this simple statement, Rachel Taylor-Tuller encapsulates the spirit of Lost Peacock Creamery. She’s a first-generation farmer, veteran and chief milkmaid at the creamery. Her husband, Matthew, is known as the head cheesemaker. At the couple’s micro dairy in Olympia, Lost Peacock hand-crafts “ridiculously fabulous cheese” from the milk of goats.

“I fell in love with goats and thought about what job I could do that would let me own all the goats,” explains Taylor-Tuller. She’s only half joking. A goat diary was what she landed on, even though the couple had no prior farming experience.

“It’s very hard for first-generation farmers to break into dairy,” she says. Lost Peacock is required to adhere to the same regulations, licensing and infrastructure of a large commercial goat dairy, even though it is a fraction of the size.

Despite the many challenges, Lost Peacock takes great pride in raising and caring for its goat herd. The goats eat organic alfalfa. Each one is named, usually by the couple’s 3- and 5-year-old children. And the individual goat personalities are catered to when it’s time for milking.

“We have 100% control over our milk, which is important because that’s the source of the food we’re eating,” says Taylor-Tuller. “We believe that because our goats have such amazing lives, the milk they give us is that much better.”

The combination of clean living and lots of love transforms the goats’ milk into two types of chevre—plain and Thai garlic—and halloumi. These are sold at more than 30 grocers from Olympia to Lynnwood. In 2018 the Thai garlic chevre and halloumi earned top honors at the Washington Artisan Cheesemakers Festival as the second- and third-place winners of the People’s Choice Award. The competition included 80 cheeses presented by 18 cheesemakers.

Lost Peacock Creamery also offers opportunities to get up close and personal with its goats, chickens, peacocks, pigs and other farm animals. Goat yoga, baby goat cuddling, cheesemaking classes, day camps for kids and special events are available throughout the year.

JULIE LEYDELMEYER

For Additional Information

Lost Peacock Creamery

5504 Cross Creek Lane NE, Olympia

360.280.6730

lostpeacock.com

Pierce College Earns Spot on National Honor Roll

Cue the Pomp and Circumstance! At a recent ceremony in Washington, D.C., Pierce College Fort Steilacoom was awarded top honors—the 2019 Aspen Rising Star Award for Community College Excellence. The Rising Star designation is accompanied by a $100,000 cash award.

The national award is in recognition of leadership in several distinct, significant categories: dramatically improving student outcomes, improved student retention and completion, a commitment to equitable outcomes for students, service to military and their families, and a dedicated focus on helping all students overcome obstacles.

“Many of our students are nontraditional,” says Pierce College Chancellor and CEO Michele Johnson, Ph.D. “They’re the first in their families to go to college, and they often face financial and unique challenges. We are committed to helping each and every one of our students reach the finish line and receive an education that can change the trajectory of their lives.”

Johnson notes that the college’s completion and transfer rate is nearly 20 points above the national average. “This award represents hard work that’s being done every day across Pierce College to help students reach their goals.”

Pierce College serves 16,000 students annually on two campuses, at Fort Steilacoom in Lakewood and in Puyallup. The college also operates a teaching center at Joint Base Lewis-McChord. Evening college courses are also offered at Graham-Kapowsin and Spanaway Lake high schools in partnership with the Bethel School District.

“Our progress in improving student outcomes would not have been possible without the incredible work from everyone at our college and from our board of trustees,” said Deidre Soileau, interim president of Pierce College Fort Steilacoom. “Our employees have been willing to ask hard questions, use data to inform change, and to create new possibilities for students.”

“At every turn, Pierce College identifies and lifts barriers that stand in students’ way,” said Joshua Wyner, executive director of the Aspen Institute’s College Excellence Program. “By enacting comprehensive reforms—and measuring impact every step of the way—Pierce has improved student success at a remarkable rate.”

EMILY HAPPY

For Additional Information

Pierce College

pierce.ctc.edu

Corks & Crush

Dr Vinay & Krystal Malhotra, Bill Robertson, Dr Needham Ward, Monica Hurley, Chris Bredeson

Good Samaritan Foundation hosted its swanky Corks & Crush fundraising gala at the Washington State Fairgrounds in Puyallup. More than 440 community members attended the annual VIP event and enjoyed a gourmet dinner catered by X Group Catering and took part in wine tasting from 18 wineries.

Princess Lindsy, Lynn Dennis, Kim Swieringa

The event raised a record-breaking $1,030,000 to support MultiCare Good Samaritan Hospital in caring for patients with cardiac and vascular needs, closer to their families and support systems, when time is especially precious. The funding goes to a state-of-the-art hybrid operating room at Good Samaritan.

Dr. Needham & Diane Ward, Karyn & Jake Sterino

A hybrid OR is twice the size of a standard operating room allowing for all necessary equipment and medical teams to work with patients in the same space at the same time. This OR allows for less invasive surgeries, less radiation exposure for patients and providers, shorter recovery times, and more lives saved.

Back On the Road to Success With ACU

It is pretty common knowledge that every job application has a list of qualifications and requirements that an applicant is expected to meet. Some are particular to the job, but there are always the basics–years of related experience, education, and dependable transportation.

Without a way to get to and from work, it can be almost impossible for an applicant to gain employment or to hold onto it. Financial guidance organization Sound Outreach’s Andre Jimenez says, “One of the main barriers for our clients, seeking financial wellness, is the ability to secure reliable transportation. In the past, that barrier prevented clients from accepting high wage jobs.” Because of this, Sound Outreach and America’s Credit Union (ACU) have partnered to find a solution for those in need through the ACU’s Auto Concierge program. 

The partnership started a little over a year ago and has proven quite successful. How it works: A Sound Outreach counselor works with their client, teaching them better financial practices. when they have gone through their educational process, they contact ACU where their application is reviewed. After qualifying, ACU’s Auto Concierge finds them a reliable car, negotiates a fair price with a local dealership, delivers the vehicle, and helps establish proper insurance coverage. ACU has helped many people through several programs, but this new auto program goes the extra mile. According to ACU’s Community Development Manager, Paul Miller, this program gives an individual look at every person’s case, considering the whole financial background story, not just the credit score. 

Currently, the new Auto Concierge Program is the main focus of the partnership between ACU and Sound Outreach. “The whole concept is to help people buy an automobile that is more reliable for the foreseeable future,” says Miller. “The key is helping these people who are trying their best to move forward.” by Natalie Benson

Sources:

Interview-Paul Miller- ACU Community Development Manager

Interview-Andre Jimenez- SO Development and Communications Manager

K9 Security Program at MultiCare

MultiCare Tacoma General Hospital has launched a new K9 security program to provide an added level of safety for patients, visitors and staff. 

“Emotions can run high in hospital settings,” said Sharon Oxendale, President/COO of MultiCare Tacoma General/Allenmore Hospitals. “Having a K9 presence is sometimes all you need to diffuse emotional situations that sometimes occur in emergency rooms.”

At the center of the program is a three-year-old German Shepherd named Officer Ben and a K9 security officer named Brian Phillips. 

During a three-month pilot program, they helped reduce the number of assaults by 33 percent when compared to the same 90-day period in 2018.

“We interacted with hundreds of staff members, patients and visitors and I can’t remember a single person who had a negative reaction to Ben,” said Phillips. “A lot of people refer to him as a ‘rock star’ and are clearly happy to have him around.”

In addition to helping de-escalate more than 60 incidents during the pilot program, Ben also provided inspiration and comfort to some of the hospital’s patients, including young children that were facing stressful situations.

“It was really gratifying to see Ben interacting with some of the kids – and really a lot of adults too – who were facing tough situations and just wanted some down time to hang with Ben,” said MultiCare’s Regional Director of Security Services, Emergency Management and Business Continuity Radford Garrison. “Animals like Ben can have a calming effect and can help bring smiles to kids who might otherwise feel overly emotional.”

MultiCare is looking to add another dog to the canine unit by the end of this fall with patrols at both Auburn Medical Center and Covington Medical Center. Leah Grout

Wesley Opens Bradley Park location

Wesley is observing its 75th year with the grand opening of its third senior-living community, Wesley Bradley Park in Puyallup. The public is invited to enjoy music, hors d’oeuvres, giveaways and prize drawings at the celebration on Sunday, Aug. 25 at 1 p.m. 

“We are excited about the opportunities to develop relationships throughout the area,” says T.C. Fraser, campus administrator. “Our residents have been highly active in various community activities. This has really opened the door to many others who now call Wesley Bradley Park their home.” 

The 19-acre property on South Hill features a range of residential options. The Lodge, five stories high, includes 99 independent living residences. For assisted living–like services, there is The Commons, with 50 apartments. The Brownstone offers 32 condo-style homes. The memory care neighborhood, called The Arbor, will open with 17 apartments once state licensing has been approved. 

At the grand opening, guests are welcome to tour the community. They will see Wesley’s style of senior living, one that is full of choices. Wesley is known for its network of services. These include independent and assisted living, in-home care, skilled nursing, memory care and rehabilitative therapies. This means residents can live with as many or as few supportive services as they need. 

In addition to living and health services, Wesley Bradley Park residents have access to amenities that were developed with a wide range of interests in mind. These include a fully equipped health and wellness center, a learning center/theater, multiple dining venues, a creative arts center, a wood shop, a chapel/auditorium, a beauty salon, a club room and a library.

Fraser adds that the Wesley Bradley Park community will continue to grow and expand. An additional Brownstone apartment building is in the plan, as is a state-of-the-art post-acute rehabilitation center.

by leah grout

707 39th Ave SE, Puyallup, WA 98374

253.435.8100

wesleychoice.org/communities/bradley-park

FoxFire Salon and Spa Celebrates 35 Years

Tenacity and perseverance are two traits that have helped FoxFire Salon and Spa reach an impressive milestone—35 years in business. “It was never my intention to be a business owner,” said Karin Walker, founder and owner. “I just wanted to work with my friends doing great hair and having fun in a really nice environment.”

“I was 26 years old and needed $25,000 for the build-out of my first location,” Walker recalled. “I kept getting turned down because the bankers didn’t think I knew what I was doing, and they were right!” Young and fearless, the aspiring salon owner kept applying. Eventually she found the right lender, who by happenstance was also her client. Walker’s parents offered their home as collateral.

The founder’s vision of a high-end salon was the catalyst for FoxFire. The business opened on Feb. 14, 1984, in leased space at the intersection of Center and Orchard Streets in Tacoma. Walker credits her six original employees with playing a huge role in the salon’s overall success. Two still work with her in a staff that now numbers close to 30.

Though Walker describes her start as unintentional, she has kept a keen eye to the future. In 2001 she moved the business to its Fircrest location. She built this salon from the ground up. In 2009 she heard a rumor that a prime location in the Proctor District might soon be available. She contacted the building owner to say she was interested. Just a few months later, she opened this second location.

“It’s been quite the journey, but I’ve enjoyed it,” said Walker. “I’m a people person and have enjoyed working with my team.” She is also proud of the many awards the salons have earned over the years. Most memorable was being recognized in 2013 by Salon Today, the top business publication for owners of salons and spas. FoxFire made its list of the top 200 salons in the country.

JULIE LEYDELMEYER

For Additional Information

FoxFire Salon and Spa

1912 65th Ave W, Tacoma

2701 North Proctor St, Tacoma

253.565.7765

foxfiresalon.com