Treating Pain While Reducing the Risk of Opioid Abuse

If you’ve ever undergone a surgical or dental procedure, your doctor may have prescribed an opioid, such as oxycodone, hydrocodone, codeine, or morphine, to reduce your pain. Properly used, these drugs can be very effective. Improper use, however, can negatively affect the reward center in the brain, eventually leading to addiction.

Responsible prescribing and use of opioids is important to the physicians at Olympia Orthopaedic Associates. “We want to minimize pain for people after surgery and treat their chronic pain as well as we can, while also leading the way in educating the community about new prescribing guidelines and limits, and why they’ve been introduced,” explains Dr. Douglas Taylor, who is board-certified in anesthesiology and interventional pain management.

When an individual undergoes a procedure at Olympia Orthopaedics, says Taylor, a key conversation that takes place is about expected pain after the procedure and the treatment for that pain. “We stress that prescribed opioids are to be used as a rescue medication in times when pain is really severe,” he says. Patients are encouraged to use alternative methods for pain control. These may include icing the area, using pain patches or taking over-the-counter medicines such as ibuprofen. Also commonly used during surgery are nerve blocks, which can minimize pain for up to several days, says Taylor.

Prescribing smaller quantities of opioid medications means that fewer pills end up left over and at risk of getting into the wrong hands. “People with opioid addiction often report that they started with prescription medicines that were in the home of a family member who’d recently had surgery,” says Taylor. “We’re trying to minimize this chance by reducing the amount [of drugs] that get into the community in the first place.”

Olympia Orthopaedic physicians employ many pain treatments, including physical therapy, chiropractic, acupuncture, massage therapy and injection therapies. “We are dedicated to helping our patients heal and minimizing their pain in safe and appropriate ways,” says Taylor.

JULIE LEYDELMEYER

For Additional Information
Olympia Orthopaedic Associates
3901 Capital Mall Dr SW, Olympia
360.709.6230
olyortho.com

The Meridian Café has Re-Opened

More than a year after a roof fire forced its closure, Meridian Café is open for business. A perennial breakfast-and-lunch spot in downtown Puyallup, the surrounding communities are thrilled their beloved cafe is back open for breakfast and lunch.

Owner Shaun Brobak said there was never a doubt he would reopen – thanks in great part to the people of his community. Opening day saw a steady stream of old and new customers walking through the doors.

As is often the case with old buildings, reconstruction proved challenging. Brobak took this opportunity from the fire to reassess the restaurant’s needs and make improvements.  “Reconstruction after the fire gave us the opportunity to bring back the Café in a BIG WAY. New modern kitchen, a larger dining room, a new private banquet space and larger bathrooms, says Brobak.”

“The dining room has been updated, too,” said Brobak. He added new floors and the walls showcase old photos of historic Puyallup. Plastered walls artfully surround the brickwork preserved from the original building.  You will experience the charm of this historical building the moment you walk through the doors.

He also focused on comfortable and additional seating. Custom, hand crafted booths, similar to those at Brobak’s other business, Crockett’s Public House in downtown Puyallup, were added. The redesigned dining room ended up making room for an additional 20 patrons.   

As for the menu, with the new larger and more modern kitchen and grill, they will offer additional menu selections. “We’ve reopened with the classic menu we’ve always had and will let our guests tell us what they’d like to see on the menu. We have the capacity to introduce more items, with the same attention to quality we’re known for,” Brobak said.

Cafés have been a part of American life for more than 140 years and we know why. Few foods are comforting in quite the same way as scratch made cafe food. If you haven’t dined at Meridian Cafe lately, stop in and  to enjoy a wholesome, made-from-scratch breakfast or lunch. Bring your appetite, portions are generous, food is fresh and delicious.
Kelly Lenihan

Meridian Café – open every day 6am – 3pm for breakfast and lunch
213 N Meridian, Puyallup WA 98371
t: (253) 435-8833
crockettspublichouse.com/meridian-cafe.  
facebook.com/meridiancafepuyallup/  

Healthy Family Show


April 6th, 11am-4pm
Outlet Collection

Where Healthy Habits Collide with Style

Bring the family to enjoy a free day learning about what is new for keeping your family healthy. This one day event is an opportunity for families to check out hot trends, health information and learn about camps, classes and services! Families can also enter their child in the  Cutest Child Contest.  Plus the first 250 families who attend receive a FREE gift bag.

Interested in entering the (fun and not serious)  Cutest Child Contest and having your cute child walk the cat walk? Register at the welcome table the day of the event at noon.  This is a low-key and fun contest! Winners photo’s will be featured in on social media for ShowCase Magazine.

For further information contact info@showcasemedialive.com

Brought to you by

Cascade School

Robert Cray comes to Federal Way PAEC

Blues is the foundation of the music of Grammy Award winner Robert Cray. But it’s nearly impossible to limit his talent to one genre when his music is also influenced by traditional American rock, soul, jazz, gospel, funk and R&B.

“When I first started playing guitar, I wanted to be George Harrison. That is, until I heard Jimi Hendrix,” explains Cray. “After that, I wanted to be Albert Collins and Buddy Guy and B.B. King. And then there are singers like O.V. Wright and Bobby Blue Bland. It’s all mixed up in there. You just never know. I always attribute it to the music we grew up listening to and the radio back in the ’60s. It’s pretty wide open. It’s hard to put a tag on it.”

With five Grammys won, 15 nominations received, millions of record sales worldwide, and thousands of sold-out performances, Cray is considered one of the greatest guitarists of his generation. In 2011 he was credited by Rolling Stone with reinventing the blues with the release of his Strong Persuader album in 1986. Cray’s “distinct razor sharp guitar playing” on that album, the magazine wrote, “introduced a new generation of mainstream rock fans to the language and form of the blues.”

That same year, the rock blues icon was inducted into the Blues Hall of Fame at the age of 57, making him one of the youngest living legends to receive the prestigious honor. The Hall of Fame recognizes those who have made the blues timeless through performance, documentation, and recording.

Robert Cray will bring his trademark sound and distinct style to the stage at the Federal Way Performing Arts and Event Center on Friday, Feb. 15, at 7:30 p.m. With state-of-the-art acoustics, this intimate venue, seating only 700, is the perfect place to showcase Cray’s smooth vocals and expressive guitar solos. by Julie Leydelmeyer

For ticket information:

253.835.7010

Federal Way Performing Arts and Event Center

31510 Pete von Reichbauer Way S

Federal Way, WA 98003

Visit www.fwpaec.org

Pantages Theater Returns to Historic Glory

Tacoma not only creates it also celebrates its artistic history.

Slated for the wrecking ball in the 1980s, the historic Pantages Theater located in downtown Tacoma had seen better days. Built in 1918 for vaudeville king Alexander Pantages as part of his theater empire, the beloved theater was in deep decline and neglect. Demonstrating true Tacoma grit, citizens rallied together and saved the performance space that became part of the City of Tacoma and later the Broadway Center for the Performing Arts.

Although the loss of this historic treasure had been adverted, recent patrons, staff and performers have all known that there was much more that needed to be done. Peeling paint, sound from the street and uncomfortable seats were indicators that changes needed to be made.

Completed this November, the most recent renovation returns the inside of the Pantages much closer to its original state and also consists of updates for the safety and comfort of today’s audiences and performers.

From the new color scheme, based on the forensic research of the 22 layers of paint, to the addition of rich decoration to the private boxes that feature rosettes and shells, the Pantages has returned to it’s former glory. Details that had previously been difficult to see have been revealed and the architectural elements have been enhanced.

Modern attendees will appreciate features such as wider seats, cup holders, a new center aisle, fewer stairways, new handrails and lighting. What patrons won’t see are the new seismic and safety updates that will preserve the theater’s structure and integrity should an earthquake hit. Additionally, the acoustics of the space have been greatly improved with the elimination of the carpeting that previously absorbed sound and newly built floors.

With the busy holiday season right around the corner, now is the perfect time to see for yourself the glorious Pantages while attending a live performance.  Come down to the Theater District and celebrate! Hilary Ryan

Image By: Justin John Ryan

 

Timeless Kitchen Design

Sixty-nine percent of homes for sale list the kitchen as a major selling point, compared with forty-nine percent for the bedroom and twenty one percent for the living room. The kitchen is a communal space, where guests and family members meet first thing in the morning for breakfast and late into the night with a few drinks. By including a luxury kitchen in your home, you will sell your property an average 8% faster than other homes in the same zip code. If you only have limited resources, then start by designing a timeless and beautiful kitchen.

 

Striking, Subtle and Sophisticated Lighting

A good kitchen allows for decent cooking; a great one encourages so much more. Increase the versatility of your space by installing different lighting options. The simplest solution is dimmer switches. They can be on full brightness to wake the kids up before school, and then lowered for a relaxing evening. Go for something bold and modern to give the kitchen a personality, but also have the option to illuminate just around key cupboards and appliances. Lights are often an afterthought, but thinking about them upfront can help you to create a truly mesmerizing space.

 

Opening Up Your Space

The kitchen is a center for parties and events, so think about how you can open up the space to more people. In winter, large windows, glass doors and mirrors can give the illusion of a much wider environment. In summer, these windows and doors can be opened to extend the area outside. Bringing a few plants and fresh herbs into the kitchen can help to create a seamless transition between indoors and out.

What About Tech?

The global smart home market is expected to exceed $50 billion by 2022, so incorporating WiFi into your refrigerator could help to future-proof your property. However, don’t act prematurely. Some house hunters will be put off by excessive tech and it can be difficult to take with you when you move out. Play it safe by sticking to classic kitchen tech such as dishwashers and modern fridges.

 

For many home buyers, the kitchen is the most valuable room in the house. Get this right and you could add thousands of dollars to your property’s selling price. Consider versatility and timelessness, sticking to classic, but luxury designs.

Karoline Grimes

 

Asian-Inspired Food, Beautiful Ambiance

From the moment you enter Indochine, you feel as though you have been transported to an exotic locale. The indoor water feature fills an unassuming fish pond surrounded by rich wooden tables and benches. Warm lighting and Asian-inspired décor help set the mood. And an open floor plan invites guests to interact with one another.

While the ambiance is certainly a draw, it is the food that keeps guests returning time and time again. Known for its fusion of all Asian cuisines, Indochine creates dishes that are inspired by Thai, Chinese and even Northwest cultures. Toasted seasame wraps, a mouth-watering Indochine favorite, features chicken caramelized with roasted cashews, peanuts, sweet mango and aromatic basil served with flaky flatbread. This interpretation is requested by guests over and over. Each menu item is carefully constructed by the chefs to be not only delicious but visually stunning, says Becca Bergstrom, assistant manager. “There is a lot of heart and soul on these plates,” she says. Gluten-free options are available too.

An attentive and knowledgeable staff greets you at the door and answers questions about the current menu, potential wine pairings and popular cocktails. The environment seen in the front of the house is echoed in the kitchen, where staff members are always experimenting with new ideas. “We have quite a few ethnic backgrounds in our kitchen and it really shows in the amazing food we put out every day,” says Bergstrom. She notes that all of the desserts are handmade each day, ensuring a fresh ending to each incredible meal.

Perfect for banquet parties, date night or a late lunch, Indochine offers beautiful dishes that will please palates of all preferences.

ANDREA LERUM

Indochine
1924 Pacific Ave, Tacoma
253.272.8200
indochinedowntown.com

Homeless Backpacks

How often do you consider whether the homeless person sleeping in an exposed area is an adolescent? Or that it may have been awhile since that homeless adolescent had a decent meal?

That’s where Homeless Backpacks comes in. The nonprofit organization provides weekend food to homeless students. According to Kelly Wilson, Homeless Backpacks chair and founding board member, the program serves more than half a dozen school districts in Washington.

The organization began with a group of women getting together in the early 2000s to discuss what they could do for the homeless. The discussion led to the plan for each person to bring a “survival” item to the next meeting to fill 20 backpacks. The program’s focus evolved to provide food on the weekend for homeless middle school and high school teens.

“Back in 2006 when we started the meal program, the food was put into plastic grocery bags,” recalls Wilson.“It was obvious that there was food in the bags, so we provided each student being served a backpack to put the weekend food bag into. The student would walk into the counselor’s office with an empty backpack and walk out with a bag of food inside.”

When plastic bags were banned in Thurston County, Wilson and her team invested in an alternative bag that is thicker and heavier. “The cost of that bag is covered by bag sponsors who pay to put their logo on the bags,” Wilson explains. “These bags are much thicker, so it is not obvious that it is a bag of food.”

Homeless Backpacks serves 573 students per week at $8 a bag. The organization doesn’t receive government or grant funding. Instead, it relies on schools, churches and businesses. It also hosts two fundraisers each year to raise money and awareness.

“Our goal for Homeless Backpacks has always been to inspire and mentor other communities to produce a similar program,” says Wilson. “We are proud to say that through our mentorship and support, there are now similar programs in Grays Harbor, Lewis, Mason and Pierce counties. We hope to reach more communities in the coming years.”

JORDAN MARIE MCCAW
Homeless Backpacks
homelessbackpacks.org

Mud Bay Pet Stores

Pet lovers across Pierce and Thurston counties are familiar with the locally owned Mud Bay Pet Stores for their all-natural food, toys, and health products for our furry friends. But are you familiar with how it all got started?

Back in 1988, Elsa Wulff bought a tiny, struggling farm store known as Kellerman’s Corner in west Olympia on Mud Bay Road on the southern end of the Salish Sea. Wulff was determined to make the little shop thrive with her indomitable spirit and years of practical knowledge from caring for goats, geese, dogs and donkeys. Joined by her son Lars and daughter Marisa, Wulff rolled up her sleeves and started transforming the tiny store into her dream, a shop focusing on healthy and natural foods for dogs, cats and other animals.

With limited access to the high-quality products that they wanted to sell, the Wulffs got creative. When the organic chicken feed couldn’t be found locally, they worked with a local farmer to produce their own. A local bagel bakery was rented on Friday nights to make organic dog cookies. By making new connections in the community to develop new products, Mud Bay began establishing itself as a company that took its products and customers seriously. This expanded into providing customer education about the wide variety of ingredients and types of foods available for pets. Mud Bay developed a series of booklets to help pet owners make informed decisions about what to feed their dogs and cats.

In the summer of 2000, Wulff and family found out that Seattle’s largest chain of small-format pet stores was going out of business. The Wulffs knew that people were going to lose their jobs and that the eight neighborhood stores wouldn’t be easily replaced by big-box pet stores. They decided to take their approach to healthy nutrition for dogs and cats to metro Seattle. The leap paid off. Now their selection of wholesome dog and cat foods has grown to more than 450 unique formulas. It continues to grow every year with many new products from Pacific Northwest vendors.

Mud Bay has been an active supporter of Puget Sound animal shelters by providing free food to thousands of adopted cats and dogs as well as donating significantly to organizations that contribute to the welfare of animals.

A lot has changed since the first shop opened 30 years ago, but Mud Bay continues to be dedicated to helping customers find the best natural foods for their dogs and cats. They know that a happy pet means a happy person, and that helps make the world a better place for everyone.

HILLARY RYAN
Mud Bay Pet Stores
mudbay.com

New Owner of Olympic Landscape

Olympic Landscape has been designing, building and servicing outdoor residential and commercial spaces in the South Sound for more than 40 years. As an expert landscape contractor, the company creates beautiful outdoor living spaces, unique gathering spaces and specially-themed gardens for homes and businesses. Now the new owner and CEO, Joe Areyano, plans to continue that legacy. He is also adding new services and products that will carry Olympic forward for at least another 40 years.

“My family started a landscape company in 1980, so I’ve been around the industry for the majority of my life,” says Areyano. “At age 16, I started learning every division of the company, from landscape retaining walls to irrigation.” After about five years, he was promoted to field manager and continued to work his way into greater responsibilities. He’s now a certified landscape professional. This hands-on experience, he says, helps him ensure that customers receive the highest-quality service.

Areyano purchased Olympic Landscape from founder Neil Hedman last fall and has already started expanding. The new owner intends to grow the company into a regional leader expanding service area and the services and products offered. Olympic has added divisions
for synthetic turf, landscape maintenance, snow and ice removal, and small works. It is also planning to take on more projects throughout Western Washington.

The growth of Olympic Landscape is good news for the community as well. The company is on target to increase the number of employees to about 50 by the end of June. Additionally, Olympic donates 10 percent of net profits to local charities and events. St. Francis House, which eases the hardships of those in need in east Pierce County, and Homeless Backpacks, which provides food to children in need for weekends and school breaks, are two that Areyano says the company is particularly proud to support.

JULIE LEYDELMEYER

Olympic Landscape
5620 112thSt E, Puyallup
253.922.7075
olympiclandscape.com