Washington Center for Performing Arts Launches Capital Campaign

The Washington Center for the Performing Arts announced last week at their annual Gala that they will be implementing the first comprehensive capital campaign since construction in 1985. With a goal of raising $8.6 million dollars to overhaul the many components that are at the heart of every theater, the campaign will touch every aspect of the Center’s interior.

Chaired by Alex and Tammy Bunn, the campaign is already 89% of the way to the goal, with over $7.6 million in commitments. With just a little under $1 million to raise, the Bunns are passionate about the facility. “The arts set children and adults up to pursue their dreams,” says Alex. “The Washington Center is an anchor in our community and shines as our region’s most treasured asset.” As a long-time board member and a past board president, Alex has a seasoned perspective on the Center and its needs.

Implemented in two phases, the improvements will be identified in two major categories as backstage and public spaces. Backstage improvements include lighting, sound, curtains and rigging.  All of these elements bring the theater to life for thousands of patrons every year. Public spaces will include 1,000 new seats, carpet, concessions remodel and interior design improvements, as well as infrastructure like HVAC and electrical upgrades.

Eager to ensure the interior of the Center matches the beautiful exterior which was renovated by the City of Olympia in 2014, Executive Director Jill Barnes believes the improvements will protect the community’s past investment and enhance how patrons feel when they walk through the doors. According to Barnes, “delivering a world-class experience is needed to maintain the highest level of quality in every aspect of the Center, from backstage and onstage, to our lobbies and concession areas.” She added, “We are proud to have the opportunity and support to preserve and care for the Washington Center for the Performing Arts like the cultural and community asset that it is.”

Barnes says the COVID-19 pandemic was a hurdle the campaign committee did not anticipate. “The shutdown due to the global pandemic has been devastating to the entire arts industry,” says Barnes. “The reopening of the Center is a true testament to the emotional power of the arts.”

She continues, “We ‘quietly’ embarked on a capital campaign several years ago. The pandemic added significant uncertainty and stress to an already herculean undertaking. The perseverance of staff, crew, and supporters during this time has been nothing short of miraculous. We know the full recovery of the arts may take years, and the possibility to recover in a fully renovated, state-of-the art venue made possible by this community fills me with hope and joy.”For more information about the Washington center, please visit www.washingtoncenter.org.

TREE Eco Home Furnishing is Now Sage Interiors

TREE Eco Home Furnishing, an award-winning furnishing and design company in Tacoma, has been relaunched as Sage Interiors. Founded by Nicole Wakley in 2017, TREE specialized in curating furniture and decor from makers in the Pacific Northwest and around the globe, while ensuring sustainability was upheld.

Sage Interiors is an evolution of the TREE brand and concept. “We are absolutely bringing the TREE feeling with us into Sage Interiors,” said Wakley. “By savoring our loved and timeless signature collections, we are stepping forward to layer them with hundreds of new curated pieces– specially sourced with the understanding of knowing what our clients want,” she explained. Their one-of-a-kind gallery, in the historic Nisqually Power Substation building in downtown Tacoma’s Brewery District, showcases a variety of handcrafted, mindfully-made pieces across a range of styles, budgets, and signature collections.

“Since establishing ourselves in the Pacific Northwest, our dream for the brand has always been evolving. We have expanded from mainly offering reclaimed wood furniture to curating thousands of exceptional, luxurious, and sustainable pieces,” said Wakley. “Don’t worry, though– we still have our famous candles and handcrafted chopping boards for when you need some quick retail therapy.”

New products now available at Sage include luxury leather, locally-made bespoke sofas and upholstery, and outdoor collections sourced especially for the Pacific Northwest. New services include a comprehensive Quickship service provided through their in-house white glove delivery team and home staging servies.

Home design and styling services are provided in-person and virtually by their talented team of designers. “It’s always a privilege to be invited into our clients’ homes and work with them one-on-one to bring their styles to life. These personalized services are becoming the soul of the brand,” said Wakley. The Sage team not only believes that home is where the heart is, but that it is also a personal space to inspire and nurture the soul.

JULIE LEYDELMEYER

South Sound Private Schools

Tacoma

Annie Wright School
827 N Tacoma Ave
253.272.2216
aw.org

Bellarmine Preparatory School
2300 S Washington St
253.752.7701
bellarmineprep.org

Charles Wright School
7723 Chambers Creek Rd W
253.620.8300
charleswright.org

Life Christian School
1717 S Union Ave
253.756.5317
wherelifehappens.org

Puyallup

All Saints Elementary School
504 2nd Street SW
253.845.5025
allsaintspuyallup.org

Cascade Christian Schools
811 21st St E
253.841.1776
cascadechristian.org

Northwest Christian School
904 Shaw Rd
253.845.5722
nwchristianschool.org

Gig Harbor

Gig Harbor Academy
6830 32nd St NW
253.265.2150
gigharboracademy.org

Harbor Montessori
5414 Comte Dr NW
253.851.5722
harbormontessori.org

Lighthouse Christian School
3008 36th ST NW
253.858.5962
lcsschool.org

Lacey/Olympia

Olympia Community School
114 20th Ave SE
360-866-8047
olympiacommunityschool.org

Northwest Christian Academy
4710 Park Center Ave E
360.491.2966
ncslacey.org

Nova Middle School
2020 22nd Ave SE
360.491.7097
novaschool.org

Clothing as Communication at All Ages

With the pandemic forcing many to spend so much time at home, you may not have given fashion much thought over the past year. If there is one thing that we have learned during the pandemic, however, it is the importance of communication. From the cut of our hair to the clothes and jewelry we wear, everything we do visually is a form of communication. Actively engaging in that communication can have a surprisingly positive effect on our state of mind.

Cognitive psychologists Hajo Adam and Adam Galinksy, from Northwestern University, examined the psychological effects that wearing specific articles of clothing have on the person wearing them. Adam and Galinsky identified the phenomenon called “Enclothed Cognition” which relates to the effect that clothing has upon a person’s mental process and the way they think, feel, and function, in areas like attention, confidence, or abstract thinking.

Much of the world is now facing the same challenge that professionals leaving the workforce for retirement have faced for generations — how do you maintain your identity when your home has suddenly become your whole world?

You may have thought that you have been dressing to impress other people for all of those years, but the truth is, clothing has a significant impact on our self-image. The way we dress, even when we do not directly interact with other people, can have a notable effect on productivity, energy levels, confidence and overall sense of well-being.

You may not want to wear a suit and tie or your best high heels around the house, but if wearing well-tailored clothing and nice jewelry is part of the routine that gives you confidence and brings order to your day, it is important to keep up the habit.

With so many style icons joining the ranks of the “over-60 crowd,” there is no shortage of inspiration for maintaining a wardrobe that keeps you feeling fresh and inspired at every age and stage of life.

Jane Seymour, Phylicia Rashad, Priscilla Presley and Helen Mirren all make life over 60 look like the most fun they’ve ever had with fashion. At 75, Mirren is proof that confidence comes with age and experience. “I used to worry a lot more about my looks than I do now – when you’re young and beautiful, you’re paranoid and miserable. I think the great advantage of getting older is that you let go of certain things.”

ANGELA BYRGE

First of its Kind: Maritime Heritage Area

When Alexandra Gradwohl and others at the Washington Trust for Historic Preservation received word that the long campaign for a Maritime Washington National Heritage Area had been granted by the US Congress, they were elated, if not a bit surprised. You see, this was the first designation of a new National Heritage Area in more than a decade.

The 10 year+ process was rewarded with the designation as the first, and to date, only heritage area dedicated solely to Maritime Heritage. So, it’s a BIG deal.

The designation by Congress encompasses 3,000 miles of Washington State’s saltwater coastline – from Grays Harbor
County to the Canadian border. Included in the area are 18 federally recognized tribes, 13 counties, 32 incorporated cities and 30 port districts, as well as innumerable harbors, inlets, peninsulas, island shores and parks.

Throughout 2021, the Washington Trust will work with communities to develop an operational plan for the newly established Heritage Area. According to Gradwohl, “Our planning efforts and Steering Committee are bringing together various organizations and people within this area and through this, we’re creating a region-wide network with
the common thread of water. We are learning exponentially from each other.”

One steering committee member is Monique Valenzuela, Executive Director of the Youth Marine Foundation, home of the Tacoma Sea Scout Base. Founded in 1923, the Sea Scouts have continuously implemented programs so local youth can experience the water. “There is so much collaboration among this Steering Committee because we share a love of the water that is all around us,” said Valenzuela.

Some of the youth in the Sea Scouts program are working on board historic Sea Scout Ship #110, which just celebrated its 90th birthday, to earn their Quartermaster Award. Other youth are attending outings to learn more about the abundant water that surrounds them in the South Puget Sound, now a Maritime Heritage Area.

To access a new interactive on-line map where you can provide feedback on what sites you value in the new Maritime Heritage Area, visit map.preservewa.org. The Washington Trust for Historic Preservation is a statewide, tax exempt 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization founded in 1976 to safeguard Washington’s historic places.

For Additional Information
preservewa.org
ssodyssey.org

LYNN CASTLE

YMCA Opens Shelton Branch

What started out over 20 years ago as the vision of volunteers and community members to create positive youth and family activities in Shelton is now a reality. On March 1, 2021, the Shelton Family YMCA opened its doors.

Creating a ‘Place for all to Belong’ for the Shelton community during a pandemic was not ideal, but the local team persevered and overcame. Local autonomy within a massive organization like the YMCA allowed them to set goals and plan the design for the new YMCA facility located on North Shelton Springs Road.

According to Jake Grater, Executive Director of Branch Operations, “Our design goals were simple. Build something that brings the entire community together and creates a sense of belonging.” Layer that on top of the local and national organization’s goals of diversity and inclusion, and the team created a space that is welcoming and engaging.

“We were fortunate to have the experience of 2,700 other YMCA’s across the country. We created a space that is an open concept, yet an intimate space,” said Grater. The YMCA Opens Shelton Branch design utilizes lots of imagery to make people feel like the space was built for them.

Since it was founded in 1844, the Y has constantly evolved to meet the unique needs in each of the communities it serves. “This commitment to serving all people is core to who we are and our mission,” added Grater.

The new Shelton YMCA is an efficient building designed to minimize operating expenses. This approach allows the team to deploy resources towards mission work instead of maintenance work. For example, there is no carpeting in the
building, which allows for better hygiene, easier cleaning, and no long-term replacement expense.

As the first YMCA in the area, the Shelton Family YMCA joins three other Y branches within the South Sound Association, which includes the Plum Street Y, the Briggs Community Y, and the Youth & Community Development Branch, which is affectionately referred to as ‘the Y without walls.’

For Additional Information
southsoundymca.org

LYNN CASTLE

Expressions at Olympic Alzheimers

Caring for a loved one living with dementia or Alzheimer’s disease can take a toll. From their safety to their ability to relate to people around them, those living with Alzheimer’s or dementia are seeing their worlds change around them, and they are often unsure how to process it.

If it’s time to consider specialized care for a loved one living with Alzheimer’s or dementia, Olympic Alzheimer’s Residence boasts Prestige Senior Living’s award-winning Expressions memory care program. Expressions uses innovative techniques and approaches to turn daily activities into memorable and meaningful events.

By placing an emphasis on community as a vital part of the Expressions experience and fostering friendships among residents, Olympic Alzheimer’s helps residents find value and purpose.

Expressions is founded on five key principles used every day to engage residents’ minds, bodies and souls:

HEALTHY EXPRESSIONS: Exercise and physical activity are shown to slow the onset of Alzheimer’s and dementia, so the program focuses on regular physical expression, which they recommend twice a day.

TASTY EXPRESSIONS: In addition to nutrition, food also provides a chance for socialization and opportunities to reminisce about favorite foods and recipes. It is a wonderful way to stimulate the senses.

ARTISTIC EXPRESSIONS: Tapping into our creative side is important to a fulfilling life – and the program encourages residents to find their passion in arts, poetry and music. In fact, research has established that those with Alzheimer’s and other dementias often experience a spike in creativity.

EDUCATIONAL EXPRESSIONS: Residents are encouraged to continue their path of lifelong learning. Even those who are forgetful still enjoy the experience of learning.

SPIRITUAL EXPRESSIONS: Residents are provided with activities that develop inner peace through their own spiritual journey, which means different things to different people. It could be through a higher being, or an experience of awe, focused attention, or mental discipline.

If the time is right to consider specialized care for a loved one with Alzheimer’s disease or dementia, Olympic Alzheimer’s Residence has the programs in place to provide a comforting and fulfilling life while caring for your loved one’s physical and emotional needs.

Olympic Alzheimer’s Residence is located in Gig Harbor, just one mile from Tacoma Narrows Bridge. Their quiet surroundings provide a peaceful sanctuary for their residents.

For Additional Information
prestigecare.com | 253.851.5306

Crumbl Cookies: More than Just a Cookie

When you step inside of Crumbl Cookies, it feels as if you have stepped inside a secret bakery. The vibe is vivacious and magnetic. Cookie lovers can watch each step of the process at Crumbl: from bakers putting together top-shelf ingredients, to each crumbly cookie baking to perfection.

These mouthwatering cookies are definitely not just another cookie. Crumbl has perfected their cookie recipe over the years, and, based on the line out the door, they must have nailed it. They feature unique flavor combinations, such as Buckeye Brownie, Lemon Poppyseed, Biscoff, and Churro, along with classic crowd favorites like Milk Chocolate Chip and Chilled Sugar Cookie. Flavors rotate weekly, so there is always something fresh to get excited about. Also, as a bonus for the ice cream lovers out there, there is Crumbl Cream— the same extraordinary cookie flavors transformed into ice cream. With over 140 flavors, and the masterminds always working on new things, Crumbl lovers have plenty to look forward to.

Crumbl’s swanky pink boxes, easily personalized online, give guests an adorable gift option. Also, if you aren’t up for making the in-store visit, you don’t have to miss out on a cookie; Crumbl offers both curbside pick-up and delivery.

Owner Doug Clark stated that he has always done everything the “opposite of everyone else.” Doug is most excited about gaining customers with more than just a purchase, but rather with the experience. Crumbl strives to provide excellent customer service, and as they rapidly grow they are constantly improving their procedures to ensure customer satisfaction. In addition to the current Puyallup location, a new Crumbl Cookies location will open in Bonney Lake in May, 2021.

If you’re ever in the area, be sure to enjoy the Crumbl cookie experience for yourself.

For Additional Information
crumblcookies.com

MICHELLE KARNS

Celebrating 40 Years: Family Eyecare Assoc.

How you treat your customers sets you apart from others in your field. Dr. Spencer Garlick and his Family EyeCare Associates practice embraces that philosophy with his motto Do What is Best for Your Patient.

“When you treat people, including your staff, like family, you can’t help having success,” said Dr. Spencer Garlick, owner of Family EyeCare Associates in Fircrest.

Celebrating 40 years in business, Family EyeCare Associates was started in 1981 by Dr. Erick Hartman. While Dr. Hartman retired in 2016, he still fills in to stay connected with old friends and perform a service he loves.

Specializing in low vision cases, or persons legally blind but with some range of sight, brought Dr. Hartman and Dr. Garlick together in 2013. With the same specialization and more importantly, the same vision for quality eye care through caring customer service and a family friendly atmosphere, the two Doctors of Optometry created a succession plan to keep the practice in place.

A new logo for the practice was introduced this year to celebrate the 40 year anniversary. Designed by a patient, the logo features the nearby Tacoma Narrows Bridge. According to Dr. Garlick, “The logo exemplifies a bridge to future success as well as the communities we serve.”

The pandemic year of 2020 was supposed to be a great year for eyes, but that didn’t work out so well. So, in an attempt to capture some of the special significance, Dr. Garlick discovered some inadvertent hidden meaning in his new logo. A careful inspection shows the bridge has the Roman numeral XX over XX. That also adds up to 40, symbolic of the practice’s 40th year. Clearly, he was happy with his new logo design. It also goes perfectly with the last four digits of their phone number: 2020.

The entire team at Family EyeCare Associates cares about vision and eye health, stressing the importance of annual comprehensive exams. The clinic provides the full scope of optometry services as well glasses, contacts, and medical
eye exams.

Family Eyecare Associates
6314 19th Street West, Suite 1, Fircrest
familyeyecare2020.net

BY LYNN CASTLE

APCC: On a Mission for the Community

When Asia Pacific Cultural Center (APCC) was formed in 1996, it was intended to fulfill a deep need as a place that brought together significant segments of minority Americans of Asian and Pacific Islander heritage. For more than two decades, APCC has taught and celebrated the cultural history, customs, arts, crafts, people and legends from their 47 represented nations. And it has been a hub for so many people to gather and celebrate. To be entertained. To show their pride. And to help each other.

Helping each other is one of the major missions of APCC. And, help they do. Whether it is assistance in filling out government forms to start a new business or guiding members in understanding complicated regulations, APCC is there to help. The organization knows they are trusted because they look like their members and speak their language. They form a comfort zone and have the capacity and earned trust to improve their members’ lives.

Through phenomenal support from their sponsors, APCC puts on a vast number of annual events that entertain and educate. But APCC also sees a need to help with students creating many wrap-around youth programs in the local schools. Reducing stress for youth begins and ends with reducing stress on their parents. This is accomplished by APCC through housing and food assistance, two of the biggest stressful issues for any family.

As APCC approaches its 25th anniversary in November, it has expanded its role in the community by offering free testing and vaccinations, much needed food boxes and school supplies plus Resiliency Grants Assistance for small businesses. Asia Pacific Cultural Center – on a continued mission of service.

Asia Pacific Cultural Center
4851 S. Tacoma Way, Tacoma
253.383.3900
APCC96.org

BY LYNN CASTLE